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Netscape Composer - Tables

I use Netscape Composer 4.5 for website development.  In creating tables, there appears to be a problem in using the Span Columns feature.  Example:  I create a table of 5 rows and 3 columns.  To have the top cell span the 3 columns, I put the cursor in the top left cell, do a "right mouse" and then "table properties" select the "cell" tab, and enter "Cell Spans 1 row and 3 columns" and hit OK.   One would expect the top cell to span 3 cols, which it does ... sort of ... but, it pushes the 2 other columns of row 1 to the right (instead of deleting them), has white space under those new columns, and thus effectively looks like 5 columns, which is not what is desired.

Does anyone know if this is a bug in Netscape Composer?   Or if there is a way around this problem? ...perhaps some other variable which I missed?    Thanks.
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blyons48
Asked:
blyons48
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1 Solution
 
thunderchickenCommented:
do you have sample code?  does it do the same thing in IE?
0
 
blyons48Author Commented:
This is example code that was produced by Composer from creating the table as described above.  See the first row, where "apples" takes 3 columns, and "bananas" and "cherries" are pushed to the right.  And, yes, it views the same in Internet Explorer.

<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
<head>
   <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
   <meta name="Author" content="Me">
   <meta name="GENERATOR" content="Mozilla/4.51 [en] (Win95; U) [Netscape]">
   <title>TableExample</title>
</head>
<body>
&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<table BORDER COLS=3 WIDTH="100%" >
<tr>
<td COLSPAN="3">Apples</td>

<td>Bananas</td>

<td>Cherries</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td>Beef</td>

<td>Chicken</td>

<td>Pork</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td>Ford</td>

<td>Chevy</td>

<td>Cadillac</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td>Pine</td>

<td>Oak</td>

<td>Mulberry</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td>USA</td>

<td>Canada</td>

<td>Mexico</td>
</tr>
</table>

<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
</body>
</html>
0
 
mindarchCommented:
First thought without seeing the code is that you still have code for the other two cells.  If so, get rid of the code for the last two cells in that row.

Stephen
0
 
thunderchickenCommented:
html>
<head>
   
   <title>TableExample</title>
</head>
<body>
&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<table BORDER="1" COLS="3">
<tr>
<td>
Apples


<td>
Bananas
<td>
Cherries
</tr>

<tr>
<td>Beef</td>

<td>Chicken</td>

<td>Pork</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td>Ford</td>

<td>Chevy</td>

<td>Cadillac</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td">Pine</td>

<td>Oak</td>

<td>Mulberry</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td">USA</td>

<td>Canada</td>

<td>Mexico</td>
</tr>
</table>

<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
</body>
</html>

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