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NT Drive Letter Assignment at Boot Time

Posted on 2000-04-26
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How do I reassign a drive letter in Windows NT at boot time.
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Question by:jap049
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by:wlaarhov
ID: 2754234
depends on when you want it.
If you want the driveletter to be user independent (so be there if no user is logged on to the system).
You need to make a service to map the drive for you.
This can be done using SRVANY and INSTSRV from the NT Reskit.
I have done this for a Netscape Internet server (version 2.03) that needed a driveletter in order to get the webdata (documentroot) from another server.

If it is user dependent, you can make a permenant mapping.

But where do you need it for, only old stuff like the netscape server need it, the rest can be done by UNC paths(\\servername\share)
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by:jap049
ID: 2755122
Thank your for this information.  It may work.  I need to do is re-assign the CDRom drive from D: to ?:.  I need to use the D: drive as a netware drive.

Thanks again!!

Jim
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by:Tim Holman
ID: 2774735
Use Disk Administrator (start > progs > admin tools), right click on the CD, then make it Z: or something.
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by:jap049
ID: 2776939
Tim,
Thanks for your suggestion.

It will not work for me because I want it automated at netware logon time.  (Like a batch process.)
 

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wlaarhov earned 50 total points
ID: 2780256
First you ask to have the driveletter at boot time, then you talk about the cd-rom, and now you are talking loginscript???

First of all, the CD-rom doesn't need to be D:, so tim's suggestion to put it elswhere is very OK.
Then you can just get the D: drive mapped to Netware using the Netware loginscript.
To have the installation point changed to reflect the new CD-ROM location (like Z: in tim's suggestion) change the following reg-key.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\microsoft\Windows NT\currentversion\sourcepath, and change it to Z:\i386.

This should solve all you issues.
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by:Tim Holman
ID: 2787899
Remember not to map Z: on any Win 9x clients running on an NT domain.

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by:jap049
ID: 2788498
Tim,

Thanks for the reminder.

Jim
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by:jap049
ID: 2801593
FYI- I have run across another registry entry that will allow one to change the drive letter assignment of their cdrom drive.  I found this out after all of the above responses, but felt that it is noteworthy.

In the "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SYSTEM/DISK" add a new string value named "\Device\CdRom0" and have the value the letter of the drive you wish it to be (like R: Make sure you have a colon).  The next time you boot up, the CDrom drive letter will be "R:".  I have not tested it but, if you have more than one CDrom device, I suppect that CdRom1 would be the second device and so on.

Thanks again.
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by:Tim Holman
ID: 2803661
That's the setting disk administrator changes !
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