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JBuilder 3.5 - "cannot access class ..."

Posted on 2000-04-27
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Last Modified: 2011-09-20
Hi,

I want to use the class com.xxx.AAA (a third company class), so its source path was added to the project properties.

When I write:

import com.xxx.

I can see the class AAA in the pop-up list (and I can choose it), but when I compile the project I get the following error:

'Error #: 302: cannot access class com.xxx.AAA; class com.xxx.AAA; not found in stable package at line ...'

What should I do???
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Question by:s_lavie
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:cssathya
ID: 2755505
You have to add that package in the classpath in the "Project Properties".That should solve the problem.
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Author Comment

by:s_lavie
ID: 2755666
cssathya,
 
Can you be more specific?

Is there a different classpath for the project? other the one of the OS (I'm using NT 4)?

If yes where do I define it?
Cause I added that package to the OS classpath, and it didn't help :-(

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Author Comment

by:s_lavie
ID: 2755795
The problem was that I had to add the jar file to the 'Required Libraries' list - and not to the classpath.
Thanks anyway...
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Author Comment

by:s_lavie
ID: 2755796
This question has a deletion request Pending
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by:cssathya
ID: 2755925
This question no longer is pending deletion
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Expert Comment

by:cssathya
ID: 2755926
In adding the files into the project, you should also add the files that you are importing. so just click on add file on the right side and then add the specific third party files that you are using. that would make the code runnable.

whatever extra files that you are using, you have to include them in the project space.
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Author Comment

by:s_lavie
ID: 2756106
Why should I also add the files that I'm importing? What if I don't have the .java files, but only the .class files (and I don't want to decompile them)?
After adding the jar file to the
'Required Libraries', it worked fine, so what is wrong?
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Accepted Solution

by:
cssathya earned 50 total points
ID: 2756165
In case you have the pre-compiled files, then you have to have it in the required libraries.

At some point or other the jproject has to know the files that it is going to use.

If you do not add them, it will still work from outside when u say java com.xxx.AAA but it will not work when you do it inside JBuilder.

when you add the libraries, it appends the internal classpath so that it can run the project.

that is the reason for adding required libraries.
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