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Mapping network drive...

Posted on 2000-04-30
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I want to know how to map network drive on Windows 98.

For example, if my ip is 210.210.210.210, then \\210.210.210.210\$[shared folder name].

Isn't it wrong?

Thanks.
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Question by:iamjhkang
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3 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:pjknibbs
ID: 2763366
UNC pathnames use the *name* of the machine, not its IP address. The $ is only used on NT, and then only for shares added by the operating system--user shares work the same as in 9x.

Therefore, if you have a machine called MyMachine, and there's a share on it called MyShare, you'd access this share using this path:

\\MyMachine\MyShare
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wlaarhov earned 120 total points
ID: 2763444
Pjknibbs:
What you told is not true, you absolutely don't need the name.
the command "net use \\10.10.10.1\share" works always and without any problem.
only the $ in jamjhkang's example was at the wrong place.
NT has standard a number of shares (c$ and Admin$) that you can use.
The $ sign makes the share hidden under NT, but are accesseble through NT.
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Author Comment

by:iamjhkang
ID: 2763468
Thanks so much.
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