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NT 4 & 2000 lose profile on server

Posted on 2000-05-01
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Last Modified: 2010-04-14
I am running NT 4 and 2000 dual boot.
The problem is that that when ever I swith form one OS to another I have to go into the network settings and reset the connectin with the server, or else it cannot find my profile to log me in. I think it has to do with the SID's ,but I am not sure how to synchronize them.  What can I do?
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Question by:e_P
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by:White_Buffalo
ID: 2767454
I'm not sure, but I would guess that NT4 and Win2K store profile info differently.

How are you getting into network settings to reset the connection with the server if you are not logged in?
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by:t_ogawa
ID: 2767874
(1)is it roaming profile?
(2)NT4 and 2000 have same computer name ?

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by:t_ogawa
ID: 2767875
(1)is it roaming profile?
(2)NT4 and 2000 have same computer name ?

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by:e_P
ID: 2769872
It is not a roaming profile.
Yes they do have the same computer name, sorry should have mentioned this.

to change the network settings I go into the Network properties. Take the machine out of the domain and then put it back in.
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by:jdtan
ID: 2770127
Yeah, I have the same problem. It's not losing your profile. It's just a conflicting computer name. You could change one computer name, but you would then (presumably) lose DNS ability for it.

What I do is just have one OS not be in the domain. I still have full IP connectivity, and I can still map shares with any server in the domain.
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Author Comment

by:e_P
ID: 2774805
For testing purposes I need to have both of the OS's able to be part of the domain.  I think I am going to try to have 2 computer names for each OS. I'll see what happens.

-P
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by:jdtan
ID: 2775001
I think that should work fine. Again, the only problem is that you can't do reverse DNS on it, but if you ever need it, you could always use the direct IP instead.
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iolo earned 50 total points
ID: 2779374
Had this ***same*** problem.  Here's the fix:

In the OS that was last installed, go into the network identification properties (right-click on network neighborhood or the W2k equivalent) and change from a domain to a workgroup (or vice versa).  Reboot.  Go back into the network identification properties and set yourself back up for the domain/workgroup.  Under W2k this should immediately allow you to connect back, and then when you reboot to the NT4, you should be ok as well (providing you have not totally confused the server with previous attempts to fix this like I had).  If this doesn't work, I'd try doing the same procedure to the second OS (try W2k FIRST though).

This has worked for us five times in the last two weeks.
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by:e_P
ID: 2781969
iolo:

I have been doing this for a while now.  That is the only way I can get the machine to log back on into the domain.  Once I reboot and then go to NT 4 I have to do the same to it.  If I go back to Win2k, once again, I have to do the same thing over again.
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Expert Comment

by:iolo
ID: 2782502
Couple of ideas:

1.  You need to have each "OS" with a separate "computer" name on the server.

2.  Is this using user-accounts or an admin login.  If user accounts, you should set each OS up as a separate login.  I think the server wants to verify that you are indeed who you are and if it's coming from a different OS, it thinks something is wrong.

If these two things don't help, you most likely have to do the re-installation of one or both OS's and set them up this way from the beginning -- as you may be too far gone at this point for hope of a "fix".
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