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Lease Line or ISDN

Posted on 2000-05-02
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Last Modified: 2013-12-29
Hi,

Need help. My local ISP provides Lease Line and ISDN. I'm starting a new office with 20 stations initially (may grow up to 60-80 stations).

I'm wondering if I should get lease line now, because it's rather expensive.
Should I get ISDN line per 2 stations? Should I get lease line now? how fast (128k,256k,512k...) lease line should I get? Any speed comparison/guide?

Thank you.
doebuck
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Question by:doebuck
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8 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 80 total points
ID: 2772135
Which line to get depends entirely on how much Internet traffic you'll generate now and in the near future. That's not necessarily a function of how many nodes are on your network, but is more related to how much Internet access you'll allow or need and what kind of response time is acceptable.

In general the hardware that's used to implement an ISDN connection will be different from what's used for a leased line. So if you anticipate exceeding the bandwidth that an ISDN can provide (128Kbps) in the near term, you'd probably be better to go with a fractional T1 leased line. You'd only need to pay for the router once and the speed of the leased line could later be increased al the way up to a full T1. If you start with an ISDN and need more speed you'll have to replace the ISDN router.

Another consideration is what your total cost will be. A leased line is a fixed local loop charge plus whatever the ISP charges. If you are in an area that does measured service on ISDN lines, your cost will be the base cost of the ISDN line, the ISP charge, and any amount of line usage above the base allowance.
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:pjknibbs
ID: 2772541
I'd be inclined to go for the leased line unless you're only using this setup for E-mail. Speaking as someone accessing the Internet through ISDN from an office of 20 people I can tell you how appallingly slow it can be--I get considerably better performance accessing Experts Exchange from a 56k modem at home! As for the charges, I think we worked out we could afford a 128k leased line for less than the ISDN is costing us, but we *are* in the UK and have to live with BT's ridiculous pricing scale.
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LVL 63

Expert Comment

by:SysExpert
ID: 2773750
Check into DSL or ADSL. It should be much cheaper and there are speeds up to a T1 !

Prices should be in the 150-$250 for business use with speeds of 640Kbps to 1 Mbps download and 90K to 256K upload.
More that enough for an office your size.
See http://www.dslreports.com/
 for info on providers and comments on quality of service etc.
I hope this helps.
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Expert Comment

by:madmark65
ID: 2782671
Avoid ISDN.  I have been running faster on a 56.6 modem than ISDN.  Fractional T1 or DSL/ADSL as SysExpert points out ought to be compared.

Depending on where you are, broadband wireless may also be an option.  
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:doebuck
ID: 2783075
Thanks for all your effort, but i can only reward points to one of you.
My company's going to get 2 ISDN lines first and a few phone lines. We'll get the lease line later.
In my country, lease line is $2K for 64kbp and $10+K for 2Mbp per month, while ISDN is $0.04 per minute.

regards,
doebuck
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:pjknibbs
ID: 2783928
doebuck: $0.04 per minute sounds OK, but try working it out. If your Net use is even moderately heavy your ISDN will spend most of the time dialled up and costing you money. If you have a 7.5 hour day, ISDN will cost you $18 per day, $90 per week...I'm sure you can see this can soon add up to considerably more than the leased line charge over a whole year!
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2783993
Huh? Assuming the lines are up all of each work week, that's $384 per line. From what he said of the leased line costs, that's a much better deal. With two ISDNs he's got 256Kbps at $768/mo vs 64Kbps at $2000/mo.
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:pjknibbs
ID: 2784221
jlevie: You're right--I didn't read the comment properly; I thought he meant $2K per YEAR.
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