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pkgadd fills up my root

Posted on 2000-05-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Hi......
I'm doing a pkgadd -d ./pkg_name
I watch as root slowly fills up, then bails out once it reaches 100%.
It looks like the proc dir is filling up. This appears not to be a swap prob, coz I have lots of swap space defined as extra swap files on another partition.

Do I have to build a bigger root partition?
How can I get my pkgadd to work?
regards
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Question by:rickyr
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by:jlevie
ID: 2775291
How much free space do you have in /? Where does the package install to and how big is it?

It may be that the pkgadd is filling up /tmp and if that's the case you could point /tmp elsewhere (via a mount onto another filesystem or a logical link, depends on how /tmp is defined).
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roy911 earned 50 total points
ID: 2790834
Your problem is that the your /var directory is filling up. It looks like  /var is mounted under / - a pkgadd adds files under /var/sadm - you will either need to relocate /var to a unique partition or "grow" your / partition. I personally think the former choice is better.
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