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Switch / hub question

Here's an easy one: do I always use a crossover cable to link together two switches or hubs?  Are there instances when I can use a cut-through?
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Silas
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Silas
1 Solution
 
jgarrCommented:
Maybe. Normally you would use a crossover cable, but if you connect to the hub or switches MDI/MDI-X port you can select to cross the port by pressing the switch in . This allows a straight through cable to behave like a crossover.
I believe that when you connect a switch to a hub, you would use a straight through cable.

Hope this helps.
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apaduaCommented:
Every port needs to be inverted, so that the TX pair on one NIC gets to the RX pair on another. That's why the numbering on ports of some brands of hubs are 1x, 2x, 3x, etc...

So if you connect a hub to another hub, you have your pairs inverted twice, which get's you back to where you started. However, if you use a cross-over cable, you invert it a third time, which gets you back to inverted.

If your hub has an MDI/MDI-X selector on one port (as jgarr mentioned), the second selection (MDI-X) would make your port behave normally, as if it were a regular X port. IF you select MDI, you get a port that is not inverted. That way, you can connect an MDI port to a regular port of another hub with a straight cable and you have 1 inversion only, so your pairs are inverted as you wanted.

Got it? (Or lost it? :-)


A.
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barttCommented:
apadua is right and I think that he should earn the points, but from what I know is that it depends on the manufacturer of your device. I know that with Cisco switches you can use special cableling for such a connection

Bartt
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elveyCommented:

Most switches and hubs have a switch for which you can use a cut-through, though they have different labels on different equipment - MDI/MDI-X, Uplink, hub, etc.  Some have no switch, but one port has the crossover 'built in', so you use a straight thru cable.

And for very inexpensive cables, try cableclub.com; I've ordered from 'em 2x, no problems.  
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