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Using Java JTree navigation menu, is...

Posted on 2000-05-10
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Last Modified: 2010-05-19
Using Java JTree navigation menu & frames in a browser: is there a way to track the pages being displayed in
ther target frame?

I would like the JTree to reflect where
in the site the user was at any minute,
even if they use the browser button. Have experimented with applet & cookies,
but got alot of strange errors using the
netscape.javascript.* package.

Any thoughts or assistance would be
appreciated and compensation is possible
for complete solutions.

Bill Rowe
webrep@yahoo.com
0
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Question by:webrep
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6 Comments
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:heyhey_
ID: 2796959
what about using 1 x 1 applets inside all pages that will inform the main applet about page name ... it will work fine if there is only one browser window pointed to that site (otherwise, you'll need some JavaScript)
0
 

Author Comment

by:webrep
ID: 2797537
Hi Heyhey,

Is inter-applet communication
reliable in your experience? If
so then this may be a solution.

Do you know how applets on different
frames would locate each other, that's
not browser specific?

Thanks in advance,
Bill Rowe

0
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
heyhey_ earned 400 total points
ID: 2797832
according to my own experience ALL the browser JavaVM implementations use ClassLoader per URL - so if you load both applets from the same Codebase / Archive you can share static variables etc.
another option is AppletContext.getApplet() which is somewhat tricky (because both applets may be loaded from different classloaders, so you can exchange only 'standard' Java objects ...

but it seems that you'll always have problems if the user has opened several browsers to the same site ... maybe some JavaScript will help you ...

well - I can't give you code solution, but I'll help you if you have any problems ... that's an interesting question :)
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Author Comment

by:webrep
ID: 2797952
Thank you here. I will give this
some additional thought....

Bill Rowe
webrep@yahoo.com
0
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:heyhey_
ID: 2798010
ok

you can contact me at heyhey_@iname.com
0
 

Author Comment

by:webrep
ID: 2800680
Thank you very much for all
your hard work here.

Bill Rowe
0

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