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Cassette tape to audio CD

I have a Sony tape deck with phono jack outputs. Can I hook it up to my computer's sound card so that I can transfer my cassette tapes to .wav files?

My goal is to put my cassettes onto audio CD's using my computer's CD-RW drive.

What hardware (cables?) do I need?  What freeware is available to convert .wav to audio CD?
 
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masconomo
Asked:
masconomo
1 Solution
 
dovcampCommented:
I have done this before.  You need a cable that goes from RCA jacks on the tape deck site, to Mini-stereo on the computer side.  Same type of cable you would use to plug a portable cd-player into a stereo.  


The software that came with your cd/rw should have the capability to take .wav files and burn them to cd as tracks.  Adaptec Easy CD Creator, Nero, CDRwin, are examples of software that might have come with your CD/RW.

There are also specialized programs such as Adaptec's Spin Doctor on the low end, and Dart Pro on the high end that will let you record the music from your tape recorded and burn in one step, and also allow you to add special effects, such as removing background noise.


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bparnesCommented:
To amplify on what dovcamp has provided, the only hardware you need is the cable he described. You will need software that can take the audio input from the sound card and turn that input into one or more WAV files. Each of the WAV files you create will become one track on your audio CD. You should have gotten software bundled with your CD-R unit that lets you burn a bunch of WAV files onto one disk.
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israelyCommented:
You will need Adaptec Easy CD Creator Delux. It is not included with Adaptec Easy CD Creator.
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nomadic1Commented:
Actually, to add on to all of these, The burning software will work just fine, but a copy of Sound Forge or another music editing program is required to sample the sound and record it to a .wav file, as you will not be able to access the tape player as a separate drive to "drag and drop" sound files.  PCM 44.1K stereo .wav will automatically record to a disk as a CD track.
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masconomoAuthor Commented:
I assume that the cable is some sort of Y-cable that takes the two phono-jack inputs and puts it into one small output jack - input to my single audio card port.

Does my MS-Windows 98 standard Sound Recorder software capture input from this input?  Should I buy the Adaptec Deluxe or Sound Forge?
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dovcampCommented:
Yes, this is a y-cable as you describe.  Here is an example of one:
http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&Section_Id=95&pcount=&

Yes, the windows 98 standard sound recorder can capture sound from this input, but you will need to set the recording input in your volume control to record from the line-in rather than the microphone.  The win98 standard sound recorder is very limited though and I would recommend using one of the other solutions.

Adaptec Easy Creator Deluxe comes with CD Spindoctor which is the program that allows you to record directly from tape to CD.  This program retails for around $99.00.  Sonic foundry that makes Sound Forge has two versions Sound Forge (@ $500)and a scalled down version called Sound Forge XP (about $50).  The Sound Forge programs really excellent at recording the data to your computer, but you would need an additional recording program or a plug-in for these programs to be able to burn the songs to cd.

Hope this helps.
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dovcampCommented:
There are also better quality cables than this (at higher price of course) depending on how professional you need the sound quality to be.
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