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Share directory to Windows NT

Posted on 2000-05-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
I have an SCO UNIX in my Windows NT network. I want Windows NT workstation to access shared files in SCO UNIX. If there is a free software that I can download to see this files please tell me.

Motaz
www.geocities.com/motaz1
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Expert Comment

by:greeno
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Install and configure samba.

http://www.samba.org



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Expert Comment

by:loesberg
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You can also install NT 4 option pack.
It has a NFS client for NT build in so you can mount the shared directory
over NFS.

You can download option pach at http://www.microsoft.com
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by:AGB
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dgrimes earned 100 total points
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What version of SCO? If you are using OpenServer 5.x or Unixware you can use visionfs. It comes with SCO and is completely configurable to allow NT and SCO to share resources from either system. Best of all, there is no client software to load on your NT systems. Everything is loaded on the Unix server.

Access to resources on either system can be restricted/allowed according to specific users and their login permissions.

I am going to mark this as an answer because I know (if you are using the versions of SCO stated above) that this will more than meet your requirements.

It should be on your installation CD. But if not, you can download it from SCO.

Hope this helps.

PS. Just reject this answer if you are not using a version of SCO that supports visionfs.
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by:Motaz
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I found that I can access this machine using FTP in Windows NT.
There problem is that I cann't found the SCO unix in my network, and I cann't find it using it's IP address. But I can use FTP with the IP address.

What about visionfs? where can I found it? I didn't know any thing about UNIX.

Motaz
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by:loesberg
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UNIX systems are not visible in your NT "network neighbourhood".
You can make them visible and share files if you use Samba.
Or you can install the NFS client I mentioned before.
It makes all NFS servers (your UNIX box) visible in "network neighboorhood"
=> "entire network" => NFS.

However, if you are not comfortable with UNIX yet the easiest way to share
files would be FTP.

Regards,

Marcel
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by:Motaz
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I Use FTP now, it works, but it is command line. I need to automatically access UNIX files.
I think I must install Samba, but I'm afraid it can affect the system. The application running in SCO UNIX system in very very sensitive.

Motaz
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Expert Comment

by:dgrimes
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Which type and version of SCO are you running? Is it Unixware or OpenServer?

Visionfs will allow your Unix users to use Windows resources as if they were Unix resources and Windows users will be able to use Unix resources as if they were Windows resources. Everything is completely transparent to the user. As far as they know, they are using resources as standard shares.

You don't need Samba. We are using Visionsfs in over 150 stores with 2 Unix servers in each store and each store averages 6 Windows systems. In fact we have it setup so that the users on the windows systems are actually storing their windows files on the Unix servers. My Documents, User Profiles, etc. are all on the Unix servers. That way if a windows system goes down all we have to do is send/rebuild the PC and the user loses no data. Backups are also a snap as we are only backing up data on the Unix server as opposed to all the Windows systems.

In fact it doesn't matter which PC they log on to. Their area is on the Unix server. Using this configuration greatly simplifies remote administration of all of the systems giving us the flexibility to make configuration changes as needed.

But again, it depends on the SCO OS you are using.

Hope this helps!

dgrimes
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by:loesberg
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Sounds like VisioNFS is a good tool.
Go for that if you have the right version of SCO.
If not, go for Samba, it's easy to configure and I've never seen it
affect other applications on any of my HP-UX, Solaris and BSD machines.
If you need help configuring Samba I recomend SAMS "teach yourself Samba
in 24 hours" (ISBN 0-672-31609-9).

Good luck!

Marcel
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by:loesberg
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Motaz,

Would you like to accept the proposed answer?
Or, can you tell us what version of SCO you're using?

Marcel
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by:Motaz
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SCO UNIX  Server 5

How can I install the Samba in the server? I have a very limited knowlege about UNIX.

Motaz
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by:Motaz
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Answer accepted
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