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Is my computer being hacked?

I just install a internet security freeware .today,when I on-line,I have been informed the firewall has blocked the internet access from Port 28737).What is UDP port?This site has been blocked more than 20 times and number of port is increasing everytime.Is my computer being hacked by other person?
1 Solution
Well, UDP is a network protocop, you have TCP/IP and you have UDP/IP. Now, it might be that someone is trying to hack you, since the port numbers increase every time. He is probably scanning all your ports.
Serge PelletierIT ManagerCommented:
For your information the ip is from: (more to follow)
Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC2)
   These addresses have been further assigned to Asia-Pacific users.
   Contact information can be found in the APNIC database,
   at WHOIS.APNIC.NET or http://www.apnic.net/
   Please do not send spam complaints to APNIC.

   Netname: APNIC-CIDR-BLK
   Netblock: -
   Maintainer: AP

      Administrator, System  (SA90-ARIN)  sysadm@APNIC.NET

   Domain System inverse mapping provided by:


   Regional Internet Registry for the Asia-Pacific Region.
   *** Use whois -h whois.apnic.net *** *** or see http://www.apnic.net/db/ for database assistance *** Record last updated on 18-Jun-1999. Database last updated on 19-May-2000 17:47:32 EDT.
Serge PelletierIT ManagerCommented:

I am using Black ice firewall since 2 weeks because someone was hacking me.

I do see the same warning from my firewall software and here how they explain the "alert":

False Positives

This is not necessarily an attack.

This may be what is known as a "false-positive", which is when the product detects an anomaly that isn't actually an attack.

The most common source of this alert is when the user first dials up to the Internet. Busy ISPs will re-assign IP addresses quickly, which means that as soon as you dial-up with your modem, you will be assigned the IP address of another user that just hung up. Any server attempting to send data to that other user will then be sending data at you. (Just like when you get your new telephone number and you start receiving phone calls intended for the person who used to own it). The product triggers this alert every time it receives UDP data that your computer never asked for.

A common source of this attack is from RealNetworks audio/video servers. You can guess this for yourself by checking the port number (which is part of the URL above). RealAudio uses ports in the range between 6970-7080. RealNetworks triggers this alert because it is very popular, and therefore one of the more common protocols that people receive as soon as they dial-up. It also triggers this because servers will still stream data at your computer for a little while even when your RealNetworks client shuts down. Please see article q000121.


Somebody has tried to access your machine and failed.


This is one of the most common intrusions detected on the Internet. This is so common because hackers do frequent wide-spread scans looking for one specific exploit they can use to break into systems. The typical hacker scans thousands or millions of machines in a typical scan. In other words, the hacker isn't targeting you personally. In particular, this event is generated upon failed attempts, so there is no reason to worry.

Probes like this result from "script-kiddies", hackers just above the skill level of trained monkeys. They download attack programs (called "scripts") from various sites on the net, then run them against millions of machines. There are thousands of script-kiddies out there, so if you have a always-on connection (cable-modem, DSL), then you can expect about one of these scans per day.

About 10% of these scans are from forged (spoofed) addresses. This means the indicated IP address in the attack is probably from the real attack, but a small percentage of the time the indicated person is completely innocent.

About 20% of these scans are from machines already compromised by a hacker. In other words, if you report this scan back to the originator, they may thank you, because you've discovered a hacked system on their network they didn't know about.

Information on reporting the hacker can be found in our support Knowledge Base article q000016.


A port is a point of entry into a system. Each program running on a system is reached through its own ports. Most ports are "well-known", you can look them up in a table in order to get a good sense of what the hacker was looking for.
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Serge PelletierIT ManagerCommented:
Ooops just for your information and copyrights : http://www.networkice.com
Two well done answers. I just had to comment on them.
>>(UDP Port 28737).

Not a well known port, I'd panic and turn my PC off quickly if I was you!!

I seem to remember that netbus runs on this port or one very near, but i may be wrong
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