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computer beep during work

the problem i've got is that my computer sometimes got a long beep which can take between one-five minutes during regular work.
it stops the long beep after this period of time.

is it a problem with the board? dimm? video card?

its a pentium 700 with asus X4, ati2000
thanks
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talsp
Asked:
talsp
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1 Solution
 
mark2150Commented:
Might be overtemp warning. Are lights on chassis blinking and system generally unresponsive when beep occurs?

M
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talspAuthor Commented:
the system continue to work as usuall.
i havnt looked on the light on chasis.
i will next time it occurs.
what could it be if not overtemp?
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mark2150Commented:
Bad keyboard connector, stuck key,etc. Anything else happening at same time?

M
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talspAuthor Commented:
i dont think its the keyboard because everything else works fine during the beep.

i installed a pc-probe and i am checking the cpu temp now.

i've got asus p3c board.
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micro66Commented:
This is the third instance I've seen lately of an ASUS board where the fan on the CPU failed (if that's what you find here).  I can't imagine that it can be the fault of ASUS.  They build good products.  Since CPU fans are made by so many different folks, not likely that all of these are from the same shop.  At any rate, that's my first guess:  CPU fan failure, resulting in overheating.  The long beep (actually, more like a whistle, almost like the sound of a UPS that has kicked in) is an overtemp warning on the ASUS boards.
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talspAuthor Commented:
ok, thanks a lot for the info.
i will change the cpu fan.
thanx
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mark2150Commented:
Hmmm. Didn't my original post say "Might be overtemp warning." ?

M
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micro66Commented:
talsp:  I really meant for you to check to see if the CPU fan had failed.  The symptoms sound like that, but you shouldn't replace it without checking it first.  Open the case and turn the computer on.  You can see and hear if the CPU fan is working or not.  If it is working, it doesn't need replacing, obviously; however, you still most likely have a heat problem.

mark2150 did mention overheating right away.  I simply pointed you to the CPU fan as a likely culprit.  AFTER you determine what the problem really is, you can ask Customer Service to split up points in any way you think is fair.
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talspAuthor Commented:
the cpu fan is working properly.
i wonder how i should solve this problem.
i am now running a monitor software for the temprature.
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micro66Commented:
What does the temperature probe say?

If it is heat, then you need to add more fans to the case, or change the type of fan you have on the CPU, and/or add heat compound between the fan and the CPU, or all three.

You should check the case for general air flow.  Ensure that the case is not sitting against a wall or any other obstruction to either the entrance paths to the case fan(s) or the exit.

Generally, air should come in the front of a case via a case fan and exit through the power supply.  Some cases are different.  Worst is a power supply fan that blows hot air onto the CPU (they do exist).  Best is a power supply with an exhaust fan the blows hot air outside the case.  You can also add a case fan to the rear of the case to help exhaust air.  Just remember that you should have a means of pulling in as much air as you have the capability of exhausting; otherwise, you put a strain on the fans in the system, which means their motors will heat up more.

You can also purchase fans that fit into a slot where the expansion slots are.  You can get fans that blow directly on components or fans that pull in air and exhaust it through a slit in the back where the expansion cards are normally connected.

There are lots of possibilities.  But, first, you need to determine if heat is the problem.  If it is, then try some or all of these solutions.  You can help determine if it's a problem by monitoring the temperature; you might see as high as about 125F and still be reasonably OK.  Lower is better; higher is bad.  I've heard of up to 140F, but that's not good.  I have an Athlon 800 running at 98F.

If the temp seems high (don't know what it takes to set off your alarm), then remove the case cover.  USUALLY, but not always, removing the case cover will cause it to run cooler.  There are instances when the air can't flow very well around hot components with the cover off, so they heat up more.

Also, concern yourself with the routing of ribbon cables in the case to ensure airways aren't blocked.  In addition, make sure that power cords don't fall onto internal fans when the case is closed, thus stopping the fans.

The heat sink compound I mentioned can be found at most computer stores and electronic stores (including Radio Shack in the U.S.).  Put a thin layer between the fan and the CPU.  It helps to conduct heat out of the CPU case and into the fan where it can be dissipated.

Good luck.
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talspAuthor Commented:
Man i really appreciate your comments.

my Pentium 700MHz works 143F and the Asus MB works 98F
guess its very high isnt it?

all the three fans are working
the cpu fan 4753RPM or something like that.

meanwhile i have had any beeps from the time i started using the probe and till now.
i guess the CPU is afraid of it :)

i guess it is a Heat problem and waiting for the next beep to arrive :)

thanks again.
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micro66Commented:
Yes, that's too high.  Since the fans are working, it means either the ones on the CPU aren't mounted correctly, or they don't have heat sink compound and therefore are less effective, or they're just not good enough fans.  You can always use more cooling through the rest of the case, as well.  The cooler the better.  The longer you wait to fix it, even without the beep, the more damage is being done to the CPU.  Electronic components undergo a process called "temperature aging."  Each time they heat up to the failure point (which you haven't reached yet, but the process is the same) and cool back down, they will likely fail at a slightly lower point the next time.  In extreme cases, eventually, they fail at room temperature.  Take your cover off and see what the temp of the CPU does.  If it's much better, leave the cover off until you get more cooling installed.  Fans aren't very expensive, so don't skimp to save your PIII 700.
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talspAuthor Commented:
thanks a lot i will drop the cover down and check the temprature.
i will solve this problem.
i also think i amgetting bad performance at benchmarks.
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