Static libraries

Hello,

I have 2 different static libraries and an executable (let's call them A.lib and B.lib and test.exe). Test.exe calls a function in B.lib that must calls another function in A.lib (test.exe -> B.lib -> A.lib). The problem is a linker error (LNK2001: unresolved external symbol in B.lib) when building test.exe. Is there a way to tell the linker that this missing symbol is in A.lib? I'm using Visual C++ 6.0 and no MFC.

Thanks!
adnrwinAsked:
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jkrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There are two options

- add A.lib to your project

- instruct the linker to use A.lib using a '#pragma' directive, e.g.

#pragma comment ( lib, "c:\\path\\A.lib")

Feel free to ask if you need more information!
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adnrwinAuthor Commented:
You're absolutely right, but it don't resolve my problem. The source of the problem is that B.lib is written in C and A.lib in C++. If you have an answer I'll double the points or in the other case I'll give you the 100 points.
Note that test.exe is an C++ app.

Thanks
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adnrwinAuthor Commented:
You're absolutely right, but it don't resolve my problem. The source of the problem is that B.lib is written in C and A.lib in C++. If you have an answer I'll double the points or in the other case I'll give you the 100 points.
Note that test.exe is an C++ app.

Thanks
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adnrwinAuthor Commented:
Sorry for the 2 answers. There was an internal server error when submitting.
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jkrCommented:
Ahh, I think I got your problem now - I assume that you wrote both the static libraries. C++ uses name-namgling to decorate function names so the linker can distinguish between overloaded functions. In order to make that work with C code, you have to declare the functions to be used as

extern "C" a_func_thats_not_to_be_decorated();

The easiest way to do that is in your header file, e.g.

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"
{
#endif
a_func_thats_not_to_be_decorated();
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif


That will export the function in a way the linker can recognize it...
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AxterCommented:
I'm not sure if this is your situation.

If you have the code for A.lib, and B.lib, you could do the following:
Warning: Backup your project before trying this!!!

Open Test.exe project.
On the main menu, click "Project", then click "Insert Project Into Workspace".
Select project A
Then do the same for project B.

Now on the main menu, click "Project", then "Dependencies".
Select the "Test.exe" project in the "Select Project to Modify" field.
Make "Test.exe" project dependent on A and B project.
Now select "B" project, and make it dependent on "A" project.

This will force the compiler to compile in a certain order, and hold off dependent code.
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adnrwinAuthor Commented:
JKR: That's it! I give you a bonus of 100pts. This is friday!

AXTER: I've also tried your proposition and it don't work. That's really a problem of name-namgling.

Thanks to both of you.
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jkrCommented:
Thanx! :o)
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