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trouble shoot network problems

Posted on 2001-06-11
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My question is what is the general network problems in categorized?
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Question by:hueyling
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ToniVR earned 400 total points
ID: 6176420
What do you mean by general network problems?

As far as I know, it can be "categorised" in those categories (although it's actually impossible to do so)

1) Hardware problems. Defect at NIC's or bad cables and connectors.
2) Protocol problems. The protocol does not want to get installed, so does not function.
3) Configuration of the protocol. Eg IP addressing etc.
4) Operating system problems. The OS has conflicts with the entire networking stuff.

It's far from copmlete, but that are the main 4 points I go through when I face problem at a network. Most times, the problems are from 1 & 3. The other 2 catergories almost never show problems (but when they occur, they are hard to solve).

A last point: When you ask a question at EE, please provide "side-information" about it. There are a number of students who get their homework done by asking such short questions. Most experts will then start complaining about "Do your homework by yourself!".

Hopefully, when it's a homework, I get the point ;-)

ToniVR
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by:Nenadic
ID: 6176574
You can categorise network problems using the seven layer OSI model. This won't help you if this is indeed a homework assignement.
The layers from the bottom are:

PHYSICAL - physical equipment problems - cable, hub, modem, connector
DATA LINK - modem and NIC drivers, bridges and switches, MAC addresses, lower-level protocols: PPP, PPTP, SLIP, L2TP
NETWORK - router and routing problems, Layer-3 switches, network addressing (IP or IPX addresses, subnet masks and network addresses)
TRANSPORT - transport protocol problems - TCP, UDP, SPX, AppleTalk
SESSION - TCP or UDP ports, IPCs (Windows), NetBIOS (computer) names, hostnames, DNS resolution
PRESENTATION - data preparation - compression, encryption
APPLICATION - Internet browsing, email, DNS, WINS, database connectivity and any other network use.
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by:ToniVR
ID: 6177986
The OSI model is completely theoretical, and no protocol stack uses it entirely. So it would be stupid to follow it. Face networking problems, then you get max to the network layer, so that's 4. Layer 3&4 can be taken together, so that's still 3 for the network. I think they fit into my "categories". My 4 is the OS, which isn't even in the OSI model, and it can give some mistakes too!

Sorry to say so, but the OSI model is like every theoretical stuff in networking, rubbisch.

ToniVR
Industrial Engineer Electronics ICT
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by:Nenadic
ID: 6178017
ToniVR,

I appreciate that your knowledge may be superior to mine, but surely you wouldn't go as far as saying that it is better than of people who designed OSI Model - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

Yes, it is theoretical (hence the word "model"). And yes, not all protocol stacks use its entirety. However, the question isn't about troubleshooting specific protocol stacks, but troubleshooting networks.

You seem to have a major disregard for theoretical knowledge, so I assume that you solve all your problems through experience or guessing. In case both of these fail you - you probably rely on trial-and-error. All of which are fine, if they suit you. However, they are not necessarily suitable to everyone. Precisely the reason why OSI was developed - to provide a theoretical framework for working with a network. This is 'any network'. OSI can be applied to any environment in order to subdivide it.

Finally, until your categorisation becomes norm or standard (and with that - theoretical), OSI is a worthwhile solution.

Regards,
Nenadic
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by:hdoss
ID: 6184391
General network problems can occur in :

1. PC
2. Cabling &
3. Network Equipments

In PC, the possibilities are :

1. NIC h/w & its driver and settings
2. Protocol

In Cabling, the possibilities are :

1. patch cables
2. patch panel
3. main cable running between patch panel & box panel

In Network Equipments, the possibilities are :

1. port
2. h/w failure
3. configuration


Hope this will be helpful for you.
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by:ToniVR
ID: 6185035
Nenadic, where in the OSI model is the OS situated? Nowhere, so it ain't complete to solve problems.

It might be a guide, but it ain't complete. That's why the OSI model isn't perfect for problem-solving, it does not mention anything about the OS that has to provide all this networking stuff.

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by:Nenadic
ID: 6185192
ToniVR,

Drivers (Layer 2) are provided by OS.
Network protocols (Layer 3) IP, IPX, NetBEUI are provided by OS.
Transport protocols (Layer 4) TCP, SPX are provided by OS.
Session protocols (Layer 5) NetBIOS, Sockets are provided by OS.
Presentation protocols (Layer 6) NCP, SMB are provided by OS.
Application components (Layer 7) e-mail, browsing, file transfer, authentication are provided by OS.

==========

Hi hdoss,

You're new to EE, so welcome. Just a friendly note - selection of correct answers should be left to requesters. That is why everyone provides Comments (which requester can convert to Accepted Answers) at first, in order to maximise input of ideas. This is because, once someone posts their thoughts as an Answer - the question becomes locked and moved to a different section, thereby reducing its visibility.
All of the above is further emphasised for Answers that are not necessarily complete, or that discuss topics already brought up by other peoples' comments.

Hope you have a great time here.

Regards,
Nenadic
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by:ToniVR
ID: 6185229
Wrong, the OS may provide drivers etc, but I'm talking about the support of networking (ok, it's old, but face good old MS DOS). Anyway, nervermind. Go your way, I'll stick to mine, that worked already about 100 times, and the OSI model never helped me.
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by:Nenadic
ID: 6185235
Absolutely. I wasn't suggesting you change your way, but just to allow for different possibilities. You were the one that said OSI is "rubbisch". I was really just defending it - not attacking your methods.
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by:hdoss
ID: 6186090
Thanks for the advise, Nenadic.  
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by:hdoss
ID: 6186098
Thanks for the advise, Nenadic.  
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