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How to get a picture with less disk space?

Hi,
  I scanned picture using MGI PHOTOSUITE II. Everytihng is ok but each picture is taking a lot of disk space more than 100KB. some are like more than 300KB. How can I reduce the disk space without getting poor clarity picture. Recently I got some pictures from my friend. I don't know how they did but pictures were very clear and and the file format is jpg. and the file size is less than 30KB. Please tell me how to get pictures (less disk space) using photosuite II. thanks.
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get
Asked:
get
1 Solution
 
weedCommented:
Go to File>Save For Web and select JPEG as your file format. Adjust the compression slider down until your image starts to deteriorate. Your file size is listed at the bottom of the window. That's your "sweet spot" for that particular image. Some images will take more compression than others.
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johnbrewer1980Commented:
I presume that it works the same as my MGI Photosuite LE 6.5 in this answer.

Open your image.  From the start menu, select "Save As".  Type the filename, then select JPEG from the "Save As Type" box.  The JPEG quality slider can be moved to the left for less space and to the right for more quality.  You might have to do a number of saves with different qualities to get acceptable results in as small a space as possible.

It would be easier if you had Photoshop, since it has a preview for the quality.  Oh well, good luck!

John
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weedCommented:
johnbrewer: Thank you for violating EE etiquette and not reading the posted guidelines for posting comments and answers. Please withdraw your answer.
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johnbrewer1980Commented:
Sorry weed, please explain how I broke the guidelines.  I have read them, but am new to EE.  If I am at fault, then I'll be happy to withdraw my answer.
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johnbrewer1980Commented:
Sorry weed, please explain how I broke the guidelines.  I have read them, but am new to EE.  If I am at fault, then I'll be happy to withdraw my answer.
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weedCommented:
We only post answers here if 1) It's not a repeat of a previous comment, 2) Youre %100 of the answer, 3) There arent multiple solutions. The ONLY time i post as an answer is when its a very simple question, or after a month of being abandoned i posted the most useful comments and provided the most input...Then ill go ahead and lock it up with an answer. Using the answer button locks the question and discourages other experts from posting to the thread. Nor is it polite.
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johnbrewer1980Commented:
Sorry, I had'nt realised.  I thought that many answers could be posted and then considered.

I also originally thought that your answer referred to Photoshop, instead of Photosuite.  Please advise me how to go about removing my answer.
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weedCommented:
To remove a posted answer just post a 0 point question in the Community Support topic area asking the administrators to take a look at this question. Post the URL in your question.
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amp072397Commented:
Proposed answer rejected at the request of johnbrewer1980.

amp
Community Support Moderator
Experts Exchange
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bgillbanksCommented:
300k isn't much for a single image. I often work with images of 20meg+ and I don't really do large art (video game art is what I do) so I'm sure others have higher file sizes.

Anway in answer to your quetion. On top of what weed said another consideration is physical size. If the image contains more pixels then the file size increases. So There will be something like an image size command that will let you change the size of the picture. Making it smaller then compressing it will get the best results.

You can also reduce the amount of colours in the image but this won't really be viable for a photograph.

However both shrinking the image, reducing colour depth and compressing the image as a jpeg will reduce picture quality so be careful when you do it. Basically don't save the picture too often as that will ruin the image, also don't shrink it oo much as when you come to print the picture it will be tiny, and will look terrible.
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weedCommented:
An interesting tidbit that follows on all this. Reducing the length and width of your image by half will reduce your file size to 1/4 of what it was. So if you have an image that is 100x100 pixels and its 100k and you reduce it to 50x50 pixels you will have a filesize of 25k.
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JoeskinCommented:

after scanned your picture, you can do resize on your picture as scanned picture sometimes will have quite large image size and causes the file size also. so you can try to resize your picture and save it under jpg file format.

hope this guides you to some idea.

thank you
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weedCommented:
I think weve covered that joe....Rather thoroughly.
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Benoit CloutierCommented:
How many dpi do you set when you scan. If the picture you scan must stay on screen, you don't need more than 72 dpi. If you need to print it, yuo can go up to 300 dpi for a color photo, 600 to 1200 fo a line art with a lot of details.

benc
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LunchyCommented:
Rejecting answer because it duplicates existing comments (specifically bgillbanks comment.)  

get, your question has been open over a month, you have a lot of good advice here.  Perhaps you could accept a comment as an answer.

Lunchy
Friendly Neighbourhood Community Support Moderator

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getAuthor Commented:
I tried all these but I couldn't get clarity in the picture. Picture clarity is very dull. Thanks for your help. But I couldn't get what I want.
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weedCommented:
Picture quality is a function of your source material, your image dimensions, and the compression method and ammount used. You are GOING to lose quality when you compress images. Thats how compression works. Youll lose the least quality be resizing down but then of course you have fewer pixels to work with. You cant magically get a smaller file without sacrificing one of the above. Its a tradeoff.
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SONULOLCommented:
well if the pictures is dark and not clear what you can do is click on image--->Adjust--->Curves  

then just pull the curve line up and that should get rid of the darkness..
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weedCommented:
Time to pick an answer get.
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RADARCommented:
Get,

I don't use Photosuite, but maybe I can explain a little and you might find that helpful. You might be able to sort your way through it without someone riding you.

If you scan an image that is say 5 inches X 3 inches, you must pay attention to what your scanning resolution is. If you scan at 300 dpi (dots per inch) you will get an image that is 1500 pixels X 900 pixels. It is good to scan at higher resolutions as you get more information of the scanned image. You will need to reduce the image in your editing program to create a usuable image for the web.

If your intention is to print the images keep in mind that the print size is different than the pixel size. You can have an image that is 3 X 5 inches that prints at 72 dots per inch and one that is the same print size, but prints at 300 dots per inch. The second picture will have more information and won't be as grainy as the first.

Often image programs will resize the viewing image so that it fits on screen. You may be looking at an image that is reduced from its actual size and not realize it. Often this is represented as a precent of the actual image. If you save an image of this resolution, you will get a file size described depending on what format you saved it in.

There are differences in file formats. Here are a few by name:
.jpg It is a lossy format, which means that some of the information is lost when you save a image using this format. It is called compression. JPEG's average the color for a given area. If you compress the image too much, it gets pixelated. This looks similar to cubism in art. JEPG's are good for photographs, but poor for solid colors as they generate artifacts.

.gif GIF's are not a lossy format, but can only produce 256 colors. They compress a file by repetition of pixels horizontally across the images. If every pixel is different in that row, then the file size increases. GIF's are good for flat, solid colors of small images and poor for photos, though they have two attributes that set them apart. They can have part of their images set to transparent and they can store more than one image within the file. This multiple image capability produces an "active" gif.

.png PING, as it is pronounced, is kind of a mesh of the both GIF's and JPEG's, and was actually created with the intent of meshing them. They are lossy but not as much as JPEG's. They can be transparent like GIF's. To be honest, while all browsers now days will display them, I haven't noticed them on the Internet.

One final image file type you see, especially in Windows is, .bmp, or Bitmap. This file format is not lossy and designates what color each and every pixel color is. As a result, it usually is a very large file.

I have covered the basics here, and I appologize for being so long. I suspect that your problems stems from an interplay of several items here. You probably scanned it at a high resolution; Photosuite reduced the diplayed image for viewing; and you saved the image under an inappropriate file format.

Radar
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weedCommented:
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:
AWARD POINTS: WEED
Please leave any comments here within the next seven days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

Weed
EE Cleanup Volunteer
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