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boot problems with UNIX 386

Posted on 2001-06-13
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
Hi,

I have SEVERE problems with a SCO Unix installation.
The system won't boot anymore. It gives the message:

Stage 1 boot error cannot load boot hd(40)/boot
not a directory

Now, the data on this disc is of utmost importance, and there's no usable backup.

So what can i do?
Can i use lilo or so to boot unix ?
With dd i can make a copy of the disc, but that copy, of course, has the same malfuction.

Steven
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Question by:lobbezoo
6 Comments
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 6191089
1.  Boot to the recovery floppy.
2.  Plop the disk in another machine and mount the filesystems.
3.  Send the machine out to a firm that specializes in data recovery.
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Nisus091197
ID: 6193008
Hi,

Can the system read anything from the disk?  If not, then you can try one/more of these:

1. Put the disk into another machine and see if it boots.
2. Put the disk into another SCO box and try to mount the root partition, run fsck on it.
3. Find another disk exactly the same and replace the controller card with the good disk.  Then put it back into the SCO box and see if it boots.

If you can see the partitions by mounting them on another box, then you should probably try to back it up using dd.  Only do this if you are absolutely sure that there is no physical damage to the disk.

I wish you good luck,

Regards, Nisus
http://www.omnimodo.com
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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:deana080698
ID: 6194342
Never fear - below is an excellent article on SCO Unix recovery including the exact same scenario that you have.

Hope it helps.....

Dean A.



Problem
How do I recover from a system crash under SCO UNIX System V/386 Operating System?

Solution
The following document outlines how to recover from a system crash under SCO UNIX System V/386 Operating System.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I.....................Introduction

SECTION II....................Crash Scenarios

        1.  I cannot get the "boot:" prompt or I get the message "NO OS"
        2.  I get the message "Stage 1 boot failure not a directory"
        3.  I get the message "Stage 1 boot failure loading /boot"
        4.  I get the message "Can't Exec /etc/init
        5.  I get the message "Unix not found"
        6.  I get the message "srmount: panic cannot cvtv7superb() yet."
        7.  The system will not take input at the "Type Control-D" prompt

SECTION III...................Supporting Procedures

        1.  Rooting off the hard drive
        2.  Rooting off a floppy disk
        3.  Cleaning the root filesystem
        4.  Shutting down the computer

SECTION IV....................What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails

SECTION V.....................Restoring from Tape


SECTION I - Introduction

The purpose of the following document is to explain how to recover from a
system crash when you cannot boot from your hard disk running SCO UNIX
System V/386 Operating System.  The same basic methods will also apply to
Open Desktop and to operating systems for computers based on Micro Channel
Architecture (MCA).

SECTION II of this document contains recovery procedures for various crash
scenarios.  Procedures and information used to support the crash scenarios
are found in SECTIONS III,IV, and V.  These sections are not intended to be
used by themselves. The procedures in Section II are not intended for use
for reinstallation of the root filesystem on a new hard disk - for this,
please see other articles in this database.

This tutorial assumes that you are using the N1 and N2 floppies from
the original distribution for the crash recovery.  There are notes,
where appropriate, that point out the differences between using the N1
and N2 or using the boot and root floppies.

Commands which you will be requested to type as part of the instructions
for crash recovery will be placed on separate lines.  Please type the
commands as shown.  To activate the commands, press the carriage return key
on your keyboard.  This key is usually marked either <Enter> or <Return>.

If, after proceeding through the steps outlined in this document, you are
still having problems and need to contact SCO Support Services, please refer
to SECTION VI of this document.


SECTION II  - Defining the Problem

1.  I get the message "NO OS."

    This problem is caused by an unrecoverable error which prevents the
    active partition's boot program from executing.  If SCO UNIX System
    V/386 is the active partition, this will usually occur when boot0
    has been corrupted.  It could also be caused by a corrupted masterboot,
    an invalid disk partition table, or incorrect drive parameters.

    Both masterboot and boot0 are programs that can be recovered from the
    original distribution diskettes.  The partition table and drive parameters
    can be rewritten to the disk.  However, the only practical way to restore
    them is to have first backed them up.

    While it may be possible to recover your hard disk from this error,
    extreme caution should be used.  Read through the entire recovery process
    until it is understood before attempting to recover the hard disk.

    Solution 1 is broken into two parts, Part A and Part B.  Part A describes
    the procedure for attempting recovery off boot and root floppies.  If you
    have boot and root floppies, try Part A.  Part B describes the procedure
    for attempting recovery off the N1 and N2 diskettes.  If you do not have
    boot and root floppies, use this procedure.

    A.  Place the boot floppy in drive 0 and start up the computer.  At the
        boot prompt, just press <Enter>.  When asked to do so, insert the root
        floppy.  After loading the text and data, a # prompt should appear.

        At this point, it is necessary to clean the root filesystem.  To
        do this, see SECTION III PART 3.

        If the filesystem check proceeds to completion, look to see if the
        drive parameters appear to be correct.  To do this, type:

                          /etc/dkinit 0 0

        A menu should appear from which you will select option 1 (Display
        current disk parameters).  The hard drive configuration for your
        primary hard drive should appear.  See if these values are reasonable,
        but DO NOT ATTEMPT to change them.  Select 'q' to quit.

        Next, type:

                          /etc/fdisk

        A menu should appear from which you will select option 1 (Display
        Partition Table).  Make sure that SCO UNIX System V/386 is the active
        partition.  Press <Enter> to return to the menu.  If SCO UNIX System
        V/386 is not the active partition, select option 5 (Activate Partition)
        and set the SCO UNIX System V/386 partition to active.  Then shutdown
        the system by typing:

                          /etc/haltsys

        Boot the system from the hard disk.  If you do not get to the `Boot:'
        prompt, then restart this recovery process from the beginning of this
        section.

        NOTE: If both commands produce normal results then you may be able
        to salvage your hard disk.  If either the drive parameters or disk
        partition table are corrupted you may use the following command to
        attempt to restore the drive parameters and disk partition table from
        the root floppy.

        *** WARNING ***:  The following command may clear the fdisk table
        completely, so this should only be done if you know the fdisk table
        partitions and sizes exactly.  If the fdisk table is fine and only
        masterboot needs to be replaced, then use the dparam command below.

        If after reading above WARNING you want to continue, type:

                   /bin/dd bs=376 count=1 if=/etc/masterboot of=/dev/rhd00

        If the drive parameters and disk partition table produced seemingly
        normal results, then replace masterboot by typing the command:

                          /bin/dparam -w

        and replace boot0 and boot1 with the commands:

                          /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot0 of=/dev/hd0a
                          /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot1 of=/dev/hd0a bs=1k seek=1

        Shutdown the filesystem and reboot off the hard disk.  If you do not
        get to the `Boot:' prompt, you were unable to recover the hard drive.
        See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

     B. Boot the system from the N1 diskette and N2 diskettes.  To do this,
        follow the instructions in SECTION III PART 2.

        If the filesystem check proceeds to completion, look to see if the
        drive parameters appear to be correct.  To do this, type the command:

                          /etc/dkinit 0 0

        A menu should appear from which you will select option 1 (Display
        current disk parameters).  The hard drive configuration for your
        primary hard drive should appear.  See if these values are reasonable
        but DO NOT ATTEMPT to change them.  Select 'q' to quit.

        If the values in the disk parameters table are not correct, the root
        filesystem is corrupted and you will not be able to attempt normal
        crash recovery.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery
        Fails.

        If the values in the disk parameter table appear correct, then type:

                          /etc/fdisk

        A menu should appear from which you will select option 1 (Display
        Partition Table).  Make sure that SCO UNIX System V/386 is the active
        partition.  Press <Enter> to return to the menu.  If SCO UNIX System
        V/386 is not the active partition select option 5 (Activate Partition)
        and set the SCO UNIX System V/386 partition to active.  Then shutdown
        the system by typing:

                          /etc/haltsys

        and boot the system from the hard disk.  If you do not get to the
        `Boot:' prompt, then restart this recovery process from the beginning
        of PART B.

        NOTE: If both commands produce normal results then you may be able
        to salvage your hard disk.  If either the drive parameters or disk
        partition table are corrupted, you will not be able to attempt normal
        crash recovery.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery
        Fails.

        If the drive parameters and disk partition table produced seemingly
        normal results, then replace masterboot by typing the command:

                         /bin/dparam -w

        and replace boot0 and boot1 with the commands:

                         /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot0 of=/dev/hd0a
                         /bin/dd if=/etc/hdboot1 of=/dev/hd0a bs=1k seek=1

        Shutdown the computer according to the instructions found in SECTION
        III PART 4.

        Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

        If you do not get to the `Boot:' prompt, or the computer does not
        boot off the hard disk, normal crash recovery has failed.  See
        SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

 2.  I get the message "STAGE 1 BOOT FAILURE NOT A DIRECTORY."

     This is an unrecoverable error.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal
     Crash Recovery Fails.

 3.  I get the message "STAGE 1 BOOT FAILURE ERROR LOADING /BOOT."

     You will need to copy the boot file from the N1 floppy disk.  Follow the
     instructions in SECTION III - Boot and Root Instructions Part 1, in order
     to get the computer running off the hard drive.  Once you have done this,
     place the N1 floppy disk in drive 0 and type the following:

                         /etc/mount -r /dev/install /mnt
                         /bin/cp /mnt/boot /boot
                         /etc/umount /dev/install

     Shutdown the computer according to the instructions in SECTION III
     PART 4.

     Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

     If the computer does not boot properly then normal crash recovery has
     failed.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

 4.  I get the message "CAN'T EXEC  /ETC/INIT".

     Your file /etc/init might be corrupted.  You should attempt to replace
     this file from the N2 floppy disk.  To do so you will be required to
     boot and root off the N1 and N2 floppies.  To do so, follow the
     instructions in SECTION III PART 2.

                         /etc/mount -f AFS /dev/hd0root /mnt
                         /bin/cp /etc/init /mnt/etc/init
                         /etc/umount /dev/hd0root

     Shutdown the computer according to the instructions in SECTION III
     PART 4.

     Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

     If the computer does not boot properly then normal crash recovery has
     failed.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

 5.  I get the message "UNIX NOT FOUND".

     /unix is corrupted or missing. First boot off the hard disk and enter
     "unix.old" at the Boot prompt, as follows:

                         Boot
                         :unix.old

     If your boot is successful enter System Maintenance mode by entering
     your root password at the "Control-D" prompt.  Then type the following
     commands.
                         rm /unix
                         cp /unix.old /unix
                         cd /etc/conf/cf.d
                         ./link_unix

     You should see a message saying that the UNIX kernel is being rebuilt.
     Enter "y" when asked if you want this to be the default kernel.  Enter
     "y" when asked if you want to rebuild the environment.

     Shutdown the computer by following the instructions in SECTION III
     PART 4.

     Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

     If the computer does not boot properly then normal crash recovery has
     failed.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

     If your boot with unix.old was unsuccessful, you can copy /unix from the
     N1 floppy.  Follow the instructions in SECTION III - Boot and Root
     Instructions Part 1 in order to start the computer from the hard drive.
     Then place the N1 floppy disk in drive 0 and type the following:

                         /etc/mount -r /dev/install /mnt
                         /bin/cp /mnt/unix /unix
                         /etc/umount /dev/install
                         /etc/brand serno key /unix

     where "serno" is the serial number and "key" is the activation key that
     is supplied with your SCO UNIX System V/386 Release 3.2 Operating System
     diskettes.  This is the same serial number and activation key that you
     used during installation.

     Once you have done that, shutdown the computer by following the
     instructions in SECTION III PART 4.

     Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

     If the computer does not boot properly, then normal crash recovery has
     failed.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

     At the "Control-D" prompt enter System Maintenance mode by typing in your
     root password.  At the # prompt, type the following:

                        cd /etc/conf/cf.d
                        ./link_unix

     You should see a message saying that the UNIX kernel is being rebuilt.
     Enter "y" when asked if you want this to be the default kernel.  Enter
     "y" when asked if you want to rebuild the environment.

     Shutdown the computer by following the instructions in SECTION III
     PART 4.

     Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

     If the computer does not boot properly then normal crash recovery has
     failed.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

 6.  I get the message "SRMOUNT: PANIC CANNOT CVTV7SUPERB() YET."

     This is usually a non-recoverable error.  It indicates severe filesystem
     corruption.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

 7.  The system will not take input at the prompt "Type CONTROL-D to continue
     with normal startup, (or give the root password for System Maintenance)".

     Most commonly, the above prompt will be stair-stepped and you will not
     be able to input anything to that prompt.  The /etc/ioctl.syscon file
     has lost its SANE settings.

     When you reach the "Type CONTROL-D ..." prompt, type the root password
     followed by a <Ctrl>-J.  You may have to enter <Ctrl>-J several times.
     When you are logged in, remove the /etc/ioctl.syscon file.  Then reboot
     the machine.  Rebooting will automatically recreate the /etc/ioctl.syscon
     file.

     Also, check to see that the following three files are linked together and
     have the major/minor numbers 3/1.

                 /dev/console
                 /dev/syscon
                 /dev/systty

     To verify this, type:

                 l -i <the above named devices>

     Which should return:

     # crw--w--w-  3 bin     terminal   3,   1  Oct 08 12:19 <named device>

     Note that the date may not be the same as your devices.  If these devices
     are not linked, then the number 3 will not appear after the permissions
     column. The three devices must be linked together.  See ln(C) in the
     SCO UNIX System V/386 User's Reference to see how to link the devices.


SECTION III - Boot and Root Instructions

If you have created emergency boot and root floppy disks you can use them for
crash recovery.  However, the N1 and N2 original distribution floppies can be
substituted in place of the boot and root floppies.

This tutorial will assume that you are using the N1 and N2 floppies from the
original distribution for the crash recovery.  There will be notes, where
appropriate, that will point out the differences of using the N1 and N2 to
using the boot and root floppies.

1.  ROOTING OFF THE HARD DRIVE

    Insert the N1 (boot) floppy and turn on the computer.  The computer will
    load in the SCO UNIX System V/386 bootstrap program from the floppy disk
    and execute it.  You will see:

                SCO System V/386

                Boot:

    At the boot prompt, type:

                fd(64)unix root=hd(40) swap=hd(41) pipe=hd(40)

    If the computer fails to load the operating system and you are returned to
    a boot prompt, go to the next section (PART 2. ROOTING OFF A FLOPPY DISK).

    If the computer fails to load the operating system and you are NOT
    returned to a boot prompt, your filesystem is unrecoverable.  See
    SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

    If you see the following message:

                fsstat: root file system needs checking
                OK to check the root file system /dev/root (y/n) ?

    enter "y" for yes.

    You may see a message "invalid serial number" which you can disregard.
    In a moment, this will be followed by the message:

                Type CONTROL-d to proceed with normal startup,
                (or give root password for system maintenance)

    Enter your root password for System Maintenance mode.

    If you do not have a backup make one now.  To make a backup, you should
    use either the sysadmsh(ADM) or cpio(C).  For more information on these
    utilities, please refer to your manuals.

    If this attempt to boot off the hard disk fails, the root filesystem on
    the hard disk may be corrupted.  Attempt to follow the instructions in
    the next section (PART 2 - Rooting off a floppy disk).

2.  ROOTING OFF A FLOPPY DISK.

    Insert the N1 (boot) floppy and turn on the computer.  The computer will
    load in the SCO UNIX System V/386 bootstrap program from the floppy disk
    and execute it.  You will see:

                SCO System V/386

                Boot:

    At the boot prompt, type:

                defbootstr

    You will see:

    fd(64)unix root=fd(64) swap=ram(0) pipe=ram(1) swplo=0 nswap=16 ronly


    If your hard drive is attached to a host adapter that requires a BTLD,
    type:

                defbootstr link="package" btld=fd(60)

    where "package" is the name of your btld device.

    You will see:

    fd(64)unix root=fd(64) swap=ram(0) pipe=ram(1) swplo=0 nswap=16 ronly
    link="package" btld=fd(60)


    After a few moments the text and data will load into memory.  You will
    then see a prompt for the N2 (filesystem) floppy.  Remove the N1 (Boot)
    and insert the N2 floppy and press <Enter>.  The system display infor-
    mation will appear and you will see a menu for the keyboard selection.

    Instead of selecting a number from the menu, type:

                                shell         (SCO Unix 3.2v#.x)

                                 -or-

                                Crtl-A        (SCO Open Desktop/Server)

    This will bring you to an "<Installation>" prompt.

    NOTE: If you are using the boot/root floppy set, after inserting the
    filesystem floppy, you will go directly to a "#" prompt.

    At this point you will need to clean the root filesystem (see SECTION III,
    PART 3).

    If you do not have a backup you should shutdown the computer by following
    the instructions in SECTION III PART 4.  After the computer is shutdown
    you should then follow the instructions in SECTION III PART 1 in order
    to root and boot off the hard drive.

    If you followed the instructions in this section as a continuation of
    SECTION III PART 1, then shutdown the computer by following the
    instructions in SECTION III PART 4 and then return to SECTION III PART 1.

3.  Cleaning the root filesystem.

    In order to clean the root filesystem, type the following:

                        /etc/fsck -s /dev/hd0root

    Check fsck(ADM) in the System Administrator's Reference if any error
    messages arise.  The manual will explain the errors and how to proceed.

    If fsck asks for a SCRATCH file, press the <Del> key.  When
    you get your prompt, issue the command:

                        /etc/mknod /tmp/ramdisk b 31 26

    Run fsck again and when it asks you for a scratch file, enter
    "/tmp/ramdisk."

    If fsck completes within a few seconds without going through its normal
    phases, or if you see error messages, such as "UNKNOWN FILE SYSTEM VERSION
    65535" or "CLEANING NON SYSTEM 3 FILE SYSTEM," the filesystem is damaged
    beyond repair.  See SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails.

4.  Shutting down the computer

    Shutdown the computer by typing the following:

                        /etc/haltsys

    Remove any floppy disk you may have in drive 0.  The computer is
    shutdown when you see the following message:

                       ** Safe to Power Off **
                                -or-
                       ** Hit Any Key to Reboot **


SECTION IV - What to do if Normal Crash Recovery Fails

    If you have good, current, reliable backups of your programs and
    data, then the most reliable method of crash recovery is to restore
    from backup. See SECTION V - Restoring from Tape.  If your backups
    are on floppy disk instead of tape then substitute the floppy device
    for tape device when restoring from your backups.

    If you do not have good, current, reliable backups then your hard
    disk is your only source for your data.  There are many good
    professional data recovery services which stand a good to excellent
    chance of recovering your data.  They are expensive and the turn-
    around time may be a week or longer.  If it is imperative that you
    recover your data, this is your next best chance.  You should be able
    to locate a good data recovery service through the Yellow Pages or
    through a local computer vendor.

    If you have access to another computer running SCO UNIX System V/386, then
    there is one more procedure which we know of that may work.  DO NOT use
    this procedure if you have good backups or if you contemplate using a data
    recovery service.  THIS PROCEDURE WILL MAKE DATA RECOVERY MORE DIFFICULT
    or IMPOSSIBLE if it fails.

    Root and boot off the floppy drive according to the instructions in
    SECTION III PART 2.

    At the prompt, type the following:

                                divvy -b 1 -c 1  (3.2v2.0)

                                       -or-

                                divvy            (3.2v4.x)

    Examine the column that has the name 'root' or 'hd0root'.
    Calculate the value BLOCKS as follows:

         BLOCKS = ((the value in the Last Block column) -
                   (the value in the First Block column) + 1)
                   * 2.

    (q)uit and then (e)xit from divvy.  Halt the system with /etc/haltsys.

    On a working SCO UNIX System V/386 computer, log in as root.  Using the
    mkdev fd command, create a root filesystem floppy disk.  For more infor-
    mation on the mkdev fd command see the (ADM) section of your SCO UNIX
    System V/386 System Administrator's Reference.

    Next, at the # prompt, type the following:

           echo '\0\c'|dd bs=1k conv=sync of=/tmp/filesys
           mkfs -f AFS /tmp/filesys BLOCKS   (where BLOCKS it the value
                                              calculated above)

    Place the root filesystem floppy you created in drive 0 and then
    type the following:

           mount /dev/install /mnt
           dd if=/tmp/filesys bs=512 skip=1 count=1 of=/mnt/superblock
           umount /mnt
           rm /tmp/filesys

    On the damaged system, again, boot off the N1 and N2 floppies by
    following the instructions in SECTION III PART 2.

    At the prompt, type the following:


dd if=superblock bs=512 seek=1 count=1 of=/dev/hd0root fsck -s /dev/hd0root

    Shutdown the computer by following the instructions in SECTION III
    PART 4.

    Reboot the computer by pressing <Enter>.

    If you do not get a boot prompt or the computer hangs after pressing
    <Enter> at the boot prompt, then the attempted recovery failed.  You
    will need to reinstall the operating system from the beginning.

    If the response is recognizable, proceed to SECTION II if needed and
    attempt normal crash recovery.


SECTION V - Restoring from Tape

    WARNING: Restoring the filesystem from tape will destroy the current
             contents of your hard disk.  Make sure that you have exhausted
             the methods in SECTION II and have reliable backups before
             attempting the following procedures.


1.  RESTORING THE ROOT FILESYSTEM WITH A BOOT AND ROOT FLOPPY

    If you have available boot  and root floppies which contain the
    drivers required for your backup tape device, or you have a tape
    device for which drivers are provided in the default kernel, then the
    following steps allow you to restore your system from a tape backup:


         1. Boot your computer from your original N1 floppy.
         2. At the boot prompt, enter the command "restart".
         3. Proceed with installation of your base operating system
            until the point where you have made the root file system.
            This point varies depending on the operating system you
            install and the media you use.  The best way to tell is:

            a. If you have a tape or CD ROM installation, stop when the
               tape or CD ROM drive starts, AFTER the message "making file
               system".
            b. If you have a floppy installation, stop when the installation
               asks for some disk other than the N1 or N2.

            Duplicate the steps you used during your original installation
            unless you have other divvy divisions on your root hard disk.

            You may need the information about the divvy divisions to do so.

            WARNING: If you have other divvy divisions on your root hard
            disk in this fdisk partition, and you do not select to preserve
            them, the data will be removed.

         4. Once the root file system has been made (see above), press
            the <Del> key to stop the installation.  You should see the
            "Safe to Power Off" message.

         5. Place the boot floppy that has the correct tape device
            in the floppy drive and press <Enter>.

         6. At the Boot: prompt, press <Enter>.

         7. Insert the root floppy when requested and press <Enter>.

         8. At the # prompt, do the following:

            a.  fsck -s -y /dev/hd0root
            b.  mount /dev/hd0root /mnt
            c.  cd /mnt
            d.  rm -rf inst*
            e.  Place the cpio relative backup in the tape drive
            f.  cpio -icvudB -I <backup tape device> (usually /dev/rct0)

            The tape should then start and the files should be placed on
            your hard drive.

            g.  cd /
            h.  umount /dev/hd0root
            i.  haltsys

         The restore is complete and you should be able to reboot the computer.

         NOTE: If the above procedures are not successful you will need to

reinstall your operating system using "restart" at the boot: prompt. Once you can boot off your hard disk, enter single-user mode and restore from your cpio backup of the root filesystem.

2.  RESTORING THE ROOT FILESYSTEM WITHOUT A BOOT AND ROOT FLOPPY

    First install the basic Run Time System, the Link kit, and the
    System Administration Services on the hard disk.

    Next, run mkdev tape to configure your tape drive and reboot the system.

    You can then use the sysadmsh(ADM) to restore your filesystem.


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Author Comment

by:lobbezoo
ID: 6198035
Thanks a lot to all of you.
I tried all the solutions proposed (i know the article from SCO deana).
Nothing worked. The Partition table got a real kick in the a..
So i made a dd copy of the entire disk, and reinstalled unix on it. That seems to work ok now( alltough with old data).
More important, it leaves me some time to try to get the data from the crached disk.
I found someone with Unix 3.2 from SCO, so i can experiment now.
I'll keep you all informed here about the results.

Thansk again,
Steven
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:tfewster
ID: 7705153
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area as follows:
- PAQ & refund points

Please leave any comments here within the next 7 days

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tfewster (I don't work here, I'm just an Expert :-)
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Accepted Solution

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modulo earned 0 total points
ID: 7757480
Finalized as proposed

modulo

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