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Using laptop monitor on home pc.

Posted on 2001-06-14
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hi,
   I have a laptop screen and I was wondering if it is possible to use it as a second monitor for my pc.  Is this possible? How much would it cost?

Thanks in Advance,
Cide
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Question by:Cide
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by:slink9
ID: 6192477
I wouldn't think so.  It is a completely different technology than a standard monitor.
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by:jhance
ID: 6192498
It's possible but it's certainly NOT practical.  A laptop has no VGA input for such a purpose so you'd have to design and build your own interface to get your desktop VGA signal converted to the right format and connect to and drive the LCD.  Not impossible but certainly a difficult task.  I'm sure you could pay someone to do it for you but the cost would FAR exceed the cost to purchase a standalone LCD desktop display.  These are down below US$1000 for 17" models....
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by:slink9
ID: 6192531
Try $200 for a 17" monitor from www.tigerdirect.com.
How about $130 for a 17" monitor?
You get what you pay for, but the $130 model is a SyncMaster 753DF while $200 will get you a Hitachi 615-U-511.
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by:jhance
ID: 6192588
OK, so it's been 2 weeks since I checked the price of these things.....   8-)
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by:slink9
ID: 6192616
It helps to stay up on the current prices.  Can I buy one of those and sell it to you for a grand?  I'll even pay shipping if you pay up front.
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by:jhance
ID: 6192731
>>Can I buy one of those and sell it to you for a grand?  

I'll pass thanks.  Actually, I said 17" but was thinking the larger ones.  I think they are calling them 18" or 19" but the screen size is just HUGE!  I was looking at one from Samsung that was ~$1000 or so.  
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by:slink9
ID: 6192760
Same place - 21" CM811U - $769, KDS 21" is $489.  They have some pretty good pricing.
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by:rid
ID: 6192796
This is interesting. I won't disagree with the given comments, but consider: At some point on the graphics adapter, conventional VGA (SVGA etc) signals must be produced to drive the optional external monitor. How is this solved in actual practice? Does the graphics adapter have an isolated branch for the LCD / TFT output and another for the "VGA" output? Or does the LCD panel use the "VGA" output (like flat desktop monitors) and A/D converter circuitry? Just being curious...
Regards
/RID
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by:slink9
ID: 6192814
Would anyone care to set up a converter for less than $200?  I don't know about everyone else, but if I had the knowledge (my last electronics classes were about twenty years ago) I sure would charge more than that for it.
It doesn't seem like it was that long ago that I was in high school.  I guess the responsibilities of a wife, two kids, house, two vehicles, etc, etc make things go by pretty quickly.
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by:jhance
ID: 6192947
There are two kinds of LCDs on the market:

1) ANALOG - Here, the input is a standard VGA signal like you'd get from a standard video card.  The advantages are obvious, compatibility!!!  The biggest drawback is loss of signal quality due to converting from DIGITAL to ANALOG and then back to DIGITAL in the LCD again.

2) DIGITAL - Here you need a special video card that is designed to drive the LCD.  Here the signal is as good as it gets but you must get have a card and LCD that are compatible with each other and there are not really any established standards in this interface yet.  There ARE some "standards" but the problem is that there are more than one....

Some of the higher end models have BOTH analog and digital inputs.
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by:SysExpert
ID: 6193010
All of you are missing the point. There is no easy way t get access to the LCD INPUT. Each LCD is different and a laptop does not give you access to the input itself. Each LCD type would need a special adapter and require very delicate handling.

So , unless you can come up with a wireless inductive unit, I would forget about it.

Just my 2 cents !!

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by:jhance
ID: 6193046
>>All of you are missing the point.

No we're not.  Go back and read my first comment in this Q...
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by:SysExpert
ID: 6193079
jhance : we are discussing use a LAPTOP as a monitor.

Please see the origianl question !
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by:SysExpert
ID: 6193088
jhance - Whoops, I missed your very first comment.
Please excuse me.


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by:slink9
ID: 6193482
I thought we were talking about rigging up a laptop SCREEN as a monitor.  Maybe I am misreading here, but isn't that what it says?  It says nothing about using a laptop itself for input.
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by:Cide
ID: 6193574
Yup that's what we're talking about.
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by:jhance
ID: 6194648
>>Yup that's what we're talking about.


OK, so there's been a complete discussion here.  What more information do _YOU_ need?
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by:Cide
ID: 6194723
Not much I guess if it can't be done.
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jhance earned 50 total points
ID: 6194745
Oh but it _CAN_ be done.  See my earlier comment:

It's possible but it's certainly NOT practical.  A laptop has no VGA input for such a purpose so you'd
have to design and build your own interface to get your desktop VGA signal converted to the right format
and connect to and drive the LCD.  Not impossible but certainly a difficult task.  I'm sure you could
pay someone to do it for you but the cost would FAR exceed the cost to purchase a standalone LCD desktop
display.  
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