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25 points to margarity for CDROM insight

margarity,

In reference to:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qManageQuestion.jsp?qid=20124567

Thank you for your valuable insight.  The problem has not
been solved yet, but your response was helpful in clarifying my thinking.

Also, in another post I noted that you don't like the Registry.  I agree with that comment.

PleaseNoSpam
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pleasenospam
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magarityCommented:
Ah, hello again.  To be honest, I hadn't subscribed to the discussion after my first post due to the fact that you insisted on only conversing with people who had the exact same rare system.

After re-reading via the link provided, I see that you've softened quite a bit.  The additional information was extremely helpful.  

In an effort to try to earn my keep, I'll offer the following thoughts:

The Philips and Delta problems are, IMO, unrelated.  Due to the length of time between the lightning strike and the malfunctioning of the Philips, it would seem that the Philips has simply given up the ghost on its own likely due simply to age.

The Delta, on the other hand, is quite the mystery at first until we contemplate the machine into which it is being put.  I have personally seen several cases of 486 based machine made prior to the final ATAPI standard that recognise the identity of newer standardized CDROM drives but are *unable to actually use them*.  This is especially the case in proprietary machines by the big houses: Compaq, Gateway, etc.  Your Digital brand machine certainly fits this category, therefore my first inclination is that this is the case.  If this is true, then there is nothing 'wrong' per se...  simply a case of incompatible hardware.  This will not be fixable via BIOS update; it is inherent in the motherboard chipset.

Fights over which system will be the new spec often lead to the two or more camps each pushing their respective plans onto consumers in the hope that theirs will be adopted.  See: v90 for modems, VESA vs PCI for high speed I/O, ATAPI for non-hard drive IDE devices, etc, etc.

I suggest that you take Wizard's advice and try the new Delta CDROM drive in your Pentium class machine, which certainly has fully standardized ATAPI support.  If the drive functions there, I'll bet 90% odds that the 486 machine is simply not up to the modern spec.

regards and thanks for thinking of me,
magarity
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magarityCommented:
In support of my nonATAPI compliance theory I offer the following:

The earliest file listed in the link you give for support files for that computer is dated July of 1996.  

Here is the document summary for the ATAPI-2 specification:

http://webstore.ansi.org/ansidocstore/product.asp?sku=ANSI+X3.279-1996

The date of this document, and therefor the formalizing of the standard, is September of 1996.  String conclusion:  Your 486 is pre-standard, even though it is 'standard enough', so to speak, to be able to identify the drive, it is unable to use it properly due to who-knows-what in the exact routines use by the machine's chipset.
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magarityCommented:
I hate it when I get interrputed at work and click the submit before proofreading:  'string conclusion' should be 'strong conclusion' and there should have been a dash between non and ATAPI.
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