Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people, just like you, are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
Solved

SSL Encryption faster on W2K?

Posted on 2001-06-14
1
208 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-13
If SSL 3.0 is faster on W2K then NT 4.0, why?
NT 4.0 uses SSL 3.0, correct?  Because, I'm sure
SSL 2.0 is slower than 3.0.
0
Comment
Question by:bigfig
1 Comment
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
Moondancer earned 0 total points
ID: 7020116
100 points have been refunded to you and this question closed, since nothing has been added.

If the need still exists, you may choose to post this again to draw current attention, but please remain active in all your questions here.

Moondancer - EE Moderator
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: ZipGrep

ZipGrep is a utility that can list and search zip (.war, .ear, .jar, etc) archives for text patterns, without the need to extract the archive's contents.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way to say thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Adprep 12 84
Cursed with a Windows 2000 Server that needs to copy files 3 723
Domain Controller all of a sudden stop replicating 3 455
Windows 2000 Server Pagefile.sys Error 7 652
NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
Many businesses neglect disaster recovery and treat it as an after-thought. I can tell you first hand that data will be lost, hard drives die, servers will be hacked, and careless (or malicious) employees can ruin your data.
In an interesting question (https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/29008360/) here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to split a single image into multiple images. The primary usage for this is to place many photographs on a flatbed scanner…

860 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question