Solved

Why root Access?

Posted on 2001-06-15
4
214 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Can someone tell me in some kind of priority why specifically you need root Access to UNIX. I am not a UNIX Administrator, but I am familiar with NT, WIN2K administrator roles. So I'm not a total idiot, just a partial one when it comes to UNIX. We have a Compaq Alpha running tru64 UNIX and our hosts say they need exclusive root access, which means our people don't have root access, they also want to take away our Oracle DBA priveleges. I hear a number of reasons from various people that we can't do this but nothing concrete.
What are the differences between root, sys, and system?

If the question requires more points please let me know that as well.

Regards


0
Comment
Question by:gosportlad
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
bira earned 100 total points
ID: 6196535
Hi

 root

Is the super user default of the UNIX systems.
This user has the power to administrate all
system resources and to grant other users


SYS
When any database ORACLE is created, the user SYS,
identified by the password CHANGE_ON_INSTALL
is automatically created and granted the DBA role.
All of the base tables and views for the database
data dictionary are stored in the
schema SYS. These base tables and views are
 critical for the operation of Oracle.
 To maintain the integrity of the data dictionary,
 tables in the SYS schema are
manipulated only by Oracle; they should never be
 modified by any user or database
administrator, and no one should create any tables
in the schema of the user SYS.
Most database users should never be able to connect
 using the SYS account.
Most database users should never be able to connect
 using the SYS account.
You can connect to the database using this account
but should do so only when
instructed by Oracle personnel or documentation.

SYSTEM
When a database ORACLE is created, the user SYSTEM,
identified by the password
MANAGER, is also automatically created and granted
all system privileges for the database.
The SYSTEM username creates additional tables
and views that display
administrative information, and internal
tables and views used by Oracle tools.
Never create in the SYSTEM schema tables of
 interest to individual users.

0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:bira
ID: 6196812

  The AIX manual references root user as follow:

  root user.
  ----------
  The person who has unrestricted ability to
  access and modify any part of the
  operating system, usually the user who
  manages the system.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:mrn060900
ID: 6200381
root = administrator in NT

root = god on a unix system, they can do, look at, change anything they want.

Mike
0
 

Author Comment

by:gosportlad
ID: 6202641
Thanks, great help. Everything you have said, my hosts say they can provide roles for in UNIX. Sounds as though it's a control issue. They also claim that they cannot fully support the box if we have root privelges, although their track record indicates they aren't that good when it comes to providing fast and responsive support around issues on other boxes we have there.
0

Featured Post

PRTG Network Monitor: Intuitive Network Monitoring

Network Monitoring is essential to ensure that computer systems and network devices are running. Use PRTG to monitor LANs, servers, websites, applications and devices, bandwidth, virtual environments, remote systems, IoT, and many more. PRTG is easy to set up & use.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I promised to write further about my project, and here I am.  First, I needed to setup the Primary Server.  You can read how in this article: Setup FreeBSD Server with full HDD encryption (http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Unix/BSD/FreeBSD/A_3660-S…
Why Shell Scripting? Shell scripting is a powerful method of accessing UNIX systems and it is very flexible. Shell scripts are required when we want to execute a sequence of commands in Unix flavored operating systems. “Shell” is the command line i…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question