How to use function in template declaration

I'm trying to write a template class that can be used with different functions instead of different classes.

template<class T>
class bravo
{
bravo(int x)
{
T(x);
data = x;
}
int data;
};

Say I had the above template class, but instead of <class T> I want something like <function T>.  How can I do this?
prgrmmer93231Asked:
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AxterConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can use a function object.
Example:
class Add3Function
{
public:
     int operator()(int x)const {return x+3;}
};


template<class T>
class foo
{
public:
     foo(int x)
     {
          T f;
          data = f(x);
     };
     int data;
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
     foo<Add3Function> SomeFoo(4);
     int x = SomeFoo.data;
     return 0;
}
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AxterCommented:
Correction:
template<class T>
class foo
{
public:
     foo(int x)
     {
          data = T()(x);
     };
     int data;
};
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KangaRooCommented:
No, I think you first example was syntactically correct, it is

int x;
T f;
f(x);

and /not/
f()(x);

This allows you to use both function pointers as well as classes with operator().
Function classes are more powerfull then function pointers as they work with objects. Objects allow information being held in between 'function' calls:

template <typename T>
class U
{
   T foo;

   public:
      void bar(int x)
      {
         foo(x);
      }
};
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Andrey_KulikCommented:
Simple example using functional's

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

// simple function
int foo(int x) { return x * 2; }

// simple class
class A
{
public:
     int foo(int x) { return x + 2; }
};

// your class
class Test
{
public:
     template<class T>
     void Run(int param, T t)
     {
          cout << "Param = " << param << " | result = " << t(param) << endl;
     }
};

void main(void)
{
     Test t;
     A a;
     t.Run(10, ptr_fun(foo));
     t.Run(10, bind1st(mem_fun1(&A::foo), &a));
}

Best regards
Andrey
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Andrey_KulikCommented:
IMHO my example is more flexible :)
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KangaRooCommented:
It's..... different ;)

Function objects are indeed also used as parameters to template functions. The STL is crammed with algorithm implementations that take those as a template argument.

>> bind1st(mem_fun1(&A::foo), &a)
Interesting, I think I have to go and decipher some STL code....

Nice example Andrey!
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prgrmmer93231Author Commented:
Andrey_Kulik,
I tried your method, but I got a compile error for ptr_fun.
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AxterCommented:
Did you put the #include <functional>
And did you either put using namespace std;
Or std::ptr_fun
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prgrmmer93231Author Commented:
Axter,
You're right.  I forgot to add the std:: prefix.

KangaRoo,
Thanks for your input.

Andrey_Kulik,
I tried both methods, but I like the first method posted better.

At one point or another, I still might use your method, so I like to give you some points for it.
I'll post a new 50 point question for you.  That's the last of my points.

I have one more question related to this. What is the difference between using "typename" and "class" in the template, and is there anything else you can put there?
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KangaRooCommented:
There is no real difference, I just like 'typename' better because template arguments can be any type and not just classes.
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prgrmmer93231Author Commented:
Thanks KangaRoo
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