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Installing RedHat 6.1....HELP!!!!!!

Posted on 2001-06-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I am new to the wonderfull (or so I have heard) world of Linux, and I want to install it on a 800 Mb hard disk, along side my other 2 hdd's, one of which is running Windows 98 SE.

Could anybody please help me with the whole partitioning thing i.e. what size the different partitions must be, and so forth.

I get it installed, but then I only have a swap partition, a boot partition and one large root partition, but I don't think that is exactly how it should be done. :-)

Please help if you can at least tell me what size the different partitions must be based on the size of the hdd I am planning to use.

Thank you in advance.
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Question by:bass2k1
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by:dorward
ID: 6198091
First: get a more recent version. Red Hat 6.1 is very old (I genearally consider the difference between 6.1 and 7.1 to be similar to that of Windows 3.1 and 95 [although without the extra instability]).

For a small disk have a swap, boot, and a large root partition is fine, the only difference I might make would be to have a seperate /home partition. How big this should be depends on how much space you want to dedicate to your own files (think c:\My Documents\ + c:\windows\profiles).

Also you are not going to get very much on an 800MB hard disk, while you can get a minimal install I would sugest upgrading to something a little bigger. 6 Gig is plenty, but with the price of hard disks it might be cheaper to go with 10 or more.
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by:bass2k1
ID: 6198528
OK. I am busy downloading v7.1 as I am typing this, and will be installing it on as you suggested i.e. a swap, boot, root and home partition. I don't really want to use this as my main OS (yet), since I have very, very little experience or knowledge of it, which is exactly the reason why I want to get this installed and working so I can dump the (not so) good ol' Windows.

The final thing I would just like to know is that if I have installed it in this manner i.e. the specific partitions, would my installation be crippled in any way, or would it function exactly the same as if I had partitions like /temp, /dev and /var ?
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dorward earned 50 total points
ID: 6198566
Nope, partitions are transparent. Unlike Windows which has C, D, etc, linux just puts everything on a file tree so it doesn't matter is /var is a seperate partition or just a directory on the / parition.
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by:bass2k1
ID: 6198651
OK...I don't know if I should ask this as a seperate question or post or whatever, but I am gonna ask it anyway. Is it posible to install 7.1 from a local hdd? I have 3 hdd's in my PC, eg. C, D and E.

I am busy downloading 7.1 now and I want to install it as soon as possible, and seeing as my CD-R had a little accident, I will need to install it off of a hdd. I am saving the files to drive C.

Is it possible to install RedHat to hdd D from hdd C, seeing as I am not able to burn the files to CD anytime soon.

Thank you very much for all your time and effort.
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by:dorward
ID: 6198738
I think it is possible (but tricky) although I don't know how - take a look at the Red Hat website for details.
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by:ToniVR
ID: 6199498
Installing from a hdd is perfectly possible.

You have to remember the partion though. Linux uses HDA for the first hdd, HDB for the second, etc.
Then, it uses numbers to allocate the partition on the hdd. HDA1 to HDA4 are the primary partitions and HDA5 to HDA8 are the logical. So when you have a C,D and E with Win98, it's most likely that C = hda1, D = hda5 and E = hda6.
Put the files in a directory RedHat on your hdd C, and when the installation asks for the location of the installation files, select hdd, partition /dev/hda1 and directory / (or /RedHat, but I think it's /).
If you downloaded an image from the web, use IsoBuster to extract the files from it.

To start the HDD installation, you need boot-floppy's (create them in Win98). under Dosutils/images you can find the images you need (boot.img to boot and paride.img for hdd/cd support). You can write them with rawrite under the dosutils map of the CD (in this case, the RedHat map).

Boot up with the boot-floppy and when the installation asks for a driver disk, insert the floppy with the paride.img image.

That should do it!!

ToniVR
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by:bass2k1
ID: 6199568
OK...but I only downloaded the i386 folder and all the SRPMS files. I didn't download the CD Image. Is it still possible? And when I create the boot floppies, do I use regular 1.44MB 3.5" disks?
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by:ToniVR
ToniVR earned 50 total points
ID: 6199576
Hmm, the installation needs the complete CD, because there is a virtual Linux-system run in memory to install the full version. So please download everything.
The floppy's are regular 1.44MB 3.5" disks.
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by:dorward
ID: 6199606
You don't need the SRPMS, they contain the source code, the i386 contains the compiled binary files.
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by:CleanupPing
ID: 9086748
bass2k1:
This old question needs to be finalized -- accept an answer, split points, or get a refund.  For information on your options, please click here-> http:/help/closing.jsp#1
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by:fciii
ID: 9667940
 No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:

PAQd and points split ToniVR/dorward

Please leave any comments here within the next seven days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER!

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