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open text file - read line from text file

By using this simple code I am able to write a line to a text file.

Dim fs, otf
Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Set otf = fs.OpenTextFile("c:\test.txt", 8, 0)
otf.writeline ("test")
otf.writeline ("test2")
otf.Close


However, in examples that I see in MSDN and elsewhere, objects are inititalized by using the following

Dim fso As New FileSystemObject, txtfile, _
fil1 As File, ts As TextStream

However I get the error message "user defined type not defined."  How come its not defined?  What am I doing wrong.  With the inelli type for diming variables I will see dim x as "integer" but I do not see FileSystemObject, File, or TextStream.

Please show me how to initialize properly so I can at least read on line from a text file.

Thanks
   
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dmontgom
Asked:
dmontgom
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1 Solution
 
JonFish85Commented:
Project -> References -> Tick "Microsoft Scripting Runtime". Then follow the MSDN code...
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hongjunCommented:
Your got to add "Microsoft Scripting Runtime" using Project->References.

hongjun
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hongjunCommented:
Oops. Just 1 minute difference. Adding the reference will allow beginners like you to be able to see the relevant methods, events, etc. When you become more and more used to it, then you might consider using the CreateObject method so that only the necessary references/libraries will be included when needed and released when not needed.

hongjun
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andyclapCommented:
>When you become more and more used to it, then you might consider using the CreateObject method so that only the necessary references/libraries will be included when needed and released when not needed.

Hmmm... I'd always recommend using references so things are strictly typed and early bound. The inclusion of libraries comment is a red herring.
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hongjunCommented:
That's the point. Learn it with including references first so that it will be more understandable.

hongjun
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andyclapCommented:
What I was saying is "Learn it with including references first" and keep using it through project references, because that's the best way to do it.
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hongjunCommented:
Ya perhaps this is what I am trying to say. Use through project references first and then simply convert those declarations and instantiations.

' Using including Project->References
Dim fso As FileSystemObject
Set fso = New FileSystemObject
...

' Using runtime
Dim fso As Object
Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystem")
...

hongjun
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andyclapCommented:
Aha, we're going around in circles here!
What I'm saying is don't bother using as Object, as early bound explicit references are better if you can use them :)
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crazyburnsCommented:
Are you just trying to read a line from a text file?

use
Open "filename.txt" for INPUT as #1
Input #1 variable1, variable2, ...
Close #1

and to write
Open "filename.txt" for OUTPUT as #1
Write #1 "text", "text2", ...
Close #1

The other way sounds likes it a little more complicated then necessary.
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Valliappan ANCommented:
There was one question last week in on a missing component for FileScriptingObject used for deleting a folder.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qShow.jsp?qid=20134210

The final answer ended at using direct VB file functions like Kill and RmDir. Since, here you don't need to add a reference etc. And no other problems.

So, you could learn FSO for your purposes, but could also use VB directory functions.

But FSO, is of course easier to use.

Cheers.
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CJHarrapCommented:
Always use early binding.... you get less problems, and the code is more efficent with less overhead.

Cheers,

CJ.
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dmontgomAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all of the advice and quick response.

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JonFish85Commented:
um might I ask why you accepted hongjun's answer if mine is the same and was posted earlier? not that it really matters, but I was just wondering
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Valliappan ANCommented:
Thats what I also wonder. And, after that, there were some discussions about it. :)
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