Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 661
  • Last Modified:

Could someone answer my questions on this LL Header?

I was hoping someone could answer my questions I posted for this LL header file.

I am not sure what this struct NodeType is for and why do you need it?
struct NodeType;

I am not sure what this line is doing?
typedef NodeType *NodePtr;

//Complete Declaration.
struct NodeType
{
int num2;
NodePtr link; Is link a pointer?
};
class List
{
public:
List(); //Constructor
~List(); //Destructor
bool Isempty() const;//Checks to see if Node is empty
void InsertAfter(int num);//Inserts the correct node value
void Delete(int num);//Deletes the correct Node value
void Print(ostream& Outfile) const;//Outputs the correct output
void Print1(ostream& Outfile) const;//Outputs the correct output

//private members of the class List.
private:

NodePtr head; I guess these are all pointers?
NodePtr tail;
NodePtr currptr;
NodePtr newNodeptr;
NodePtr searcher;
NodePtr trailer;

};

What exactly are the nodes?
0
awjackin35
Asked:
awjackin35
1 Solution
 
SEveCommented:
this link
http://swww.ee.uwa.edu.au/~plsd210/ds/lists.html
gives good picture about linked list, how it is built, what does it contain, what is "the node" and so on.
if you'll read it, i'm sure, you'll get answers to almost all of your questions.

good luck, seve

btw: link is a pointer to struct NodeType
0
 
pluimCommented:
Answers:
1. This is a forward declaration of NodeType. The actual declaration comes later. This is needed since the typedef statement uses NodeType. You need a structure because two data items need to be combined: the actual data (num2) and a pointer to the next element in the list (link).
Note that this is efficient but poor OO-programming. The structure NodeType should have been implemented as a class.

2. "NodePtr" is equivalent to "struct NodeType*". This aliasing could be done for a number of reasons. Most likely, the programmer thought "NodePtr" looked cleaner (or easier) than "struct NodeType*". It certainly is shorter.

3. Yes, link is a pointer. Its actual type is "struct NodeType*" (see 2). Or, in English, "Link is a pointer to a NodeType structure".

4. Yes, they are all pointers.

5. Each element in the list is a NodeType structure. These are the nodes. All the List class does is keep track of the last/ first/ current element, and offer some basic functions such as insert/ delete/ isEmpty. The actual data, as well as a pointer to the next element (node) is stored in a NodeType structure.
0
 
nietodCommented:
Does anyone know if this accepted answer was posted as a comment or as an answer?
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
SEveCommented:
i guess, pluim knows :-)
0
 
nietodCommented:
If you haven't cleared your e-mail trash recently, you might be able to find the notification of pluim's post.  it will indicate if the post was a comment or answer.  (If you don't mind searching, that is.)
0
 
SEveCommented:
i don't mind, but i don't keep this kind of messages for a long time. sorry

seve
0
 
nietodCommented:
That's fine.

Anyone else know?  we're trying to measure the number of comments vs answers.
0
 
awjackin35Author Commented:
It was a comment
0

Featured Post

VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now