Solved

Stopping roaming profiles on certain servers

Posted on 2001-06-26
2
298 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Is there a way to stop terminal server profiles roaming to certain terminal servers?  My problems is that I have a farm of NT4.0 Terminal/Citrix servers and all users have terminal server profile paths in their user accounts.  This all works fine.  However the network now has several dozen windows 2000 servers running terminal services (in Admin mode) for administration and maintenance.   My problems is that when a user remotely connects to one of these 2000 servers they will download their NT4.0 TSE profile to it.  My problem gets worse as we are about to bring eight new Win2k Terminal servers in Application mode that users will access.  We cannot have NT40 profiles on these server (and visa versa).

Does anyone know a way to stop a specific server from downloading a roaming profile and to always use a local one.  I tried setting the slow network connection as high as it would go but these servers are on a giga-bit backbone and the logon sails right by the slow net detection!

Any ideas?
0
Comment
Question by:darrenburke
2 Comments
 
LVL 13

Accepted Solution

by:
ocon827679 earned 300 total points
ID: 6230890
You might have a couple options, but as long as you specify a roaming profile in the users' properties, then you're going to download their NT profile at least once.  You could add a registry change in the TSE login script that will set the users' profile to local, at least you only have to worry about downloading it once, after that the local will always be used.  The key to look at is HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\@SID.  You want to set the Reg_DWord to a 0 for local.
Another option you might have is to use a system variable for the server that you want profiles to go to rather than the server name itself.  We implemented this corporately and it works great.  Basically you set variables for each server that you want to house profiles.  These variables need to be applied to all workstations and server, specifically terminal servers, in the network.  Then you apply to each user the variable that corresponds to their profile server in User Manager.  It goes somethng like this:
Make a list of variables for all servers that house profiles:
%profile1% = server1
%profile2% = server2, etc.

Use a script to apply these variables to all workstations and servers.

Change each user's properties for their profile to reflect the variable:
\\%profile1%\profiles\%username%

If you want you can change the variables on the Terminal Servers to a central location.

Either way you still have the user profiles on the Terminal Servers because profiles get created for every user regardless.  You can't get around that issue.  The nice thing that the second suggestion gives you is a potentially smaller user profile on the Terminal Server if you specify it's variable different than regular network use (no terminal Server).  This keeps the size of all of the profiles down, which also affects the registry size.
0
 
LVL 4

Author Comment

by:darrenburke
ID: 6231522
You are a genius!   Thank you.  I am going with the second suggestion, i.e setting local environment variables for the location of the profile path.

Thanks again

Darren
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Port Scanner

Check which ports are open to the outside world. Helps make sure that your firewall rules are working as intended.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Migrate DFS role 3 857
Outlook 2013 Certicate error 1 296
Domain dunctional level. 4 324
Terminal 2000 connection RDP 5 140
NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
IT certifications are a concrete representation of continual learning on the part of the candidate.  Continual learning is necessary for the long term success of an IT professional, but are IT certifications the right path for you?

861 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question