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Is there a way to find out what previous kernels were installed?

Posted on 2001-06-28
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hello,

I remember having installed Red Hat 6.2, then doing an upgrade install to Red Hat 7.0, then  Red Hat 7.1.  

Is there a way to find out what kernels were installed by looking at the distribution CDs or looking at system logs?

If not, what kernels typically came with RH 6.2 and RH 7.0?

Thanks.
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Question by:peyo
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by:dorward
ID: 6235937
Look for an rpm called "kernel*****rpm"

The *s will be the version number.

For example on my Red Hat 7 system I have the kernel-2.2.16-22 package installed which is rpm version 22 of kernel 2.2.16.

However you should if possible upgrade to the latest kernel (you might want to stick to the 2.2 series which at the moment is 2.2.19 or upgrade to 2.4 which is at 2.4.5) for bug fixes and performance enhancement.
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garboua earned 50 total points
ID: 6236347
you upgraded right?  
1.  the installation, RH specifically, leaves the previous kernel skeleton under "/usr/src" and pulls out the config files ".config" and ".config.old"  so look under your /usr/src for  directories.
2.  look under "/boot" and your old images should still be there, look for vmlunuz, "ls vmlinuz*".
3. look under your /etc for "lilo.conf*.rpm*" and it sould give you at least  the previous version.  inside it should point to , what WAS, current image.

4. well, rh6.2 comes with 2.2.14, rh7.0 comes with 2.2.18, and rh7.1 comes with 2.4.2.  

5. under distro cd look under /mnt/cdrom/RedHat/RPMS and as doward suggested "ls kern*.rpm" and it should give you your detail.

good luck
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by:paulqna
ID: 6248052
uname -a

or

look in the boot.log
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by:garboua
ID: 6292289
I think you accepted an answer to this question somewhere else, Please delete this one
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