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HELP! lost my Xwindows

I'm using RHLinux7.1 and i tried to start Xwindows, 'startx' and it gives me the error "/root/.Xclients-default  no such file or directory".  Xwindows will not run.  Is there a utility to run to get Xwindows working again?  Thanks in advance!
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GorGor1
Asked:
GorGor1
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1 Solution
 
m931a2Commented:
can you log in as a user?

you can rerun the X setup with Xconfigurator (Xconf then hit tab) this will let you set it up again and rewrite your X config file.

mark
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GorGor1Author Commented:
I can't do anything in Xwindows.  I'm stuck at a shell because Xwin won't load.  Is there a utility I can run from a shell?
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colindCommented:
Yeah,

from the shell, type Xconfigurator ( should be in your path, or /usr/X11R6/bin ).  
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edvinkvCommented:
run XF86Config and choose the correct parameters.

This will configure your x-windows for startup.

Thanks
Edvin.
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praka_vCommented:
hi gorgor1
   first try that ur kernel is making boot with xwinows general the RH 7.1 starts with xwindows
or go to command promt and type setup know u can configure the x windows and probe ur vga card and after probing
qiut the sesion and restart ur system i hope now u can go directly in to xwindows
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GorGor1Author Commented:
my "/root/.Xclients-default" file is completely gone.  xwindows will not load since that file is missing.  Running XF86Config doesn't replace that file.  How do I fix this?  Maybe it isn't even an XF86Config problem??
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aminfCommented:
hello
I'm using redhat7.1 and running X but
I haven't that file and everything works well.
Xconf* is used to set parameters related to ur graphiccard and ur monitor .
but  ur error is  due to another problem ,i think .
change ur runlevel to 5 and see wether u can login using xdm or not and tell me the result

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GorGor1Author Commented:
here's a dumb question....how do I do I change runlevels?  I've done it before but I don't remember how I did it
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m931a2Commented:
at the lilo promt put the name of your kernel and the number that you want.

lilo: linux 5

the do it for good go it to /etc/inittab and look for id:3:initdefault the 3 in this example is my run level. Just change it as root to 5 and restart.


Mark
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GorGor1Author Commented:
I used the command "init 5" at the initial command prompt.  KDE is not letting me log in as root, but YES, x-windows IS now working.  There must be something wrong with runlevel 6.  Any ideas what that '.Xclients-default' file does or how I can restore it?
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colindCommented:
I had the same problem...  X was complaining that .Xclients-default was missing.  The solution ended up being to just delete a bunch of files in my /tmp directory.  When it happened to me, I could get into X as root but not as a normal user.   I couldn't find any Xclients-default file in root's home directory either so I don't know what was up with that.

So, try going into you /tmp directory in a plain shell (no X running or anything) and just delete everything, reboot into runlevel 6 and see if you can get in.  Worked for me.
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GorGor1Author Commented:
i have the files .font-unix, .X11-unix, .ICE-unix, and the directories kde-root, mcop-root, ksocket-root, and orbit-root in my /tmp directory.  You really think I should delete them??
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colindCommented:
Probably not if you are in X.  If you are in a plain shell (i.e. no X running underneath or on top or anywhere) then it should be safe.

I forget the exact name of the files that were causing me problems (this happened a couple weeks ago) but there were about 10 files with very similar names - lockfiles of some kind I'm guessing.

Anyhow, I think the worst that can happen by deleting a file in /tmp is that a program crashes.  It should start up fine the next time because no program expects files to exist in /tmp on startup...  only while they are running...  Know what I mean?

Colin

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colindCommented:
Probably not if you are in X.  If you are in a plain shell (i.e. no X running underneath or on top or anywhere) then it should be safe.

I forget the exact name of the files that were causing me problems (this happened a couple weeks ago) but there were about 10 files with very similar names - lockfiles of some kind I'm guessing.

Anyhow, I think the worst that can happen by deleting a file in /tmp is that a program crashes.  It should start up fine the next time because no program expects files to exist in /tmp on startup...  only while they are running...  Know what I mean?

Colin

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GorGor1Author Commented:
I did it and I'm getting the same problem....hmmmmmm....I don't know what to do now
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colindCommented:
Probably not if you are in X.  If you are in a plain shell (i.e. no X running underneath or on top or anywhere) then it should be safe.

I forget the exact name of the files that were causing me problems (this happened a couple weeks ago) but there were about 10 files with very similar names - lockfiles of some kind I'm guessing.

Anyhow, I think the worst that can happen by deleting a file in /tmp is that a program crashes.  It should start up fine the next time because no program expects files to exist in /tmp on startup...  only while they are running...  Know what I mean?

Colin

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m931a2Commented:
try making a file called /root/.Xclients-default and adding the line exec gnome-session to the file and restart X. If you are not running gnome then put in what ever window manager that you are using.
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m931a2Commented:
for kde i think its startkde. not sure as i don't use it.
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