Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people, just like you, are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
Solved

installation location

Posted on 2001-06-30
4
191 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi, When i install applications in linux where do i normally put them?  Where would i install them if i am a su and want everyone to be able to access the program? where would i put them if i am just a user and only want it for myself? and can you explain why please?  

thanks
0
Comment
Question by:rlivings
  • 2
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:psimation
ID: 6242104
Well, it doesn't really matter. The more important factor here is the permissions on the apllication, which will eventually dictate who get's to run it and who not.
There are a couple of "default" folders meant for installations by hand, like /usr/local ( most people opt to install to a folder under that tree cause then they know where all their apps are, but You can choose any, and even make your own, just as long as you stick with your convention, otherwise you will find it  very difficult to find your way around.
These are of course all for "manual" builds, where you typicallly download the package as a xxx.tar.gz, and then have to unpack and ./configure, make, make install and you would then usually use the --path= statement with the configure command to tell it where to install to..
If however you elect to install the package via rpm ( if the package is distributed in rpm and you have ReHat or Manrake), then the folder locations are taken care of for you by the system, and all executables are placed in the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin(for root only execution) depending on the type of application.

To get back to the permissions.
If you are root and want to give all access to an app, build it to say /usr/local/appname and then just make sure that the application executable has the correct permissions for everyone to execute it.
If you are a user and just want yourself to be ablt to execute ( and root of course, cause root can do everything anyway...), then the easiest is to build the program and install it in a folder only you have access to, typically such a folder would be your "home" folder. If you want to give certain users rights to run, you must be root and then give permissions to that specific "group" of users by creating a new group and making those specific users part of the group with execute permissions.
0
 

Author Comment

by:rlivings
ID: 6243153
psimation, can you give me an example of using the path statement with ./configure?
0
 
LVL 17

Accepted Solution

by:
psimation earned 25 total points
ID: 6244329
Well, usually it's a fairly standard one

./configure --path=/where/you/want/it

BUT! You will notice that with most any and all binary distributions you WILL have either/or/and a README,INSTALL,SOME_OTHER_TEXT_FILE that will have exact instructions for that specific application's installation.
It's important to always read those README or INSTALL files before you go ahead. Sometimes the installation is NOT via the normal route and takes the shape of a shell script or even a perl script, and then the installation is totally different, with it's own PATH= statements.
 
0
 

Author Comment

by:rlivings
ID: 6247146
thanks for the help
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
wifi not working on Raspberry Pi 3? 2 76
High Bandwidth Usage 6 75
ftp to port 21 4 53
Disabling security updates Ubuntu 3 24
If you have a server on collocation with the super-fast CPU, that doesn't mean that you get it running at full power. Here is a preamble. When doing inventory of Linux servers, that I'm administering, I've found that some of them are running on l…
SSH (Secure Shell) - Tips and Tricks As you all know SSH(Secure Shell) is a network protocol, which we use to access/transfer files securely between two networked devices. SSH was actually designed as a replacement for insecure protocols that sen…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:

790 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question