Installing of RedHat Linux on NT4.0 system...

Hi,

I have a laptop currently running Windows NT 4.0.  I would like to install RedHat Linux 7.0 on this laptop. I intended to clean the NT OS so I don't care about the current contents. I have the Linux CD with me but it's of a Linux/Unix format. I don't know how to invoke the Linux installation program as there isn't a setup.exe or any Windows executable to start the installation from within Windows. I eben tried to load the CD in the CD-ROM and changed the laptop's BIOS to boot for the CD-ROM drive but that didn't have any effect. The boot process detected an installation of NT and picked that on for the boot.

Please advance on how I can start the Linux install.

Thanks!
baigmz
baigmzAsked:
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dorwardConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I would suggest that you grab a copy of Red Hat 7.1 if possible, there are a lot of bug fixes.

If the CDs refuse to boot then you need to make boot floppies.

You will find disk images in the images directory and a program called rawrite.exe in the dosutils directory. Use rawrite to transfer the boot.img image to floppy disk.

Then boot from that floppy with the first CD in the drive.
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baigmzAuthor Commented:
I'll try this on Monday 7/9th and let you know. Thanks!
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garbouaCommented:
go to d:\dosutils if your cdrom letter is a d: and type autoboot
this should fire up the installation my friend.
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baigmzAuthor Commented:
Thanks. I'll consider this approach as well. I haven't started this yet but will let you guys know the outcome as soon as I am done. Should be before the end of this week.

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baigmzAuthor Commented:
garboua,

I called the autoboot from my RedHat 7.0's CD...I got these results...

D:\dosutils>autoboot

D:\dosutils>loadlin autoboot\vmlinuz initrd=autoboot\initrd.img
LOADLIN v1.6 (C) 1994..1996 Hans Lermen <lermen@elserv.ffm.fgan.de>

CPU is in V86-mode (may be WINDOWS, EMM386, QEMM, 386MAX, ...)
You need pure 386/486 real mode or a VCPI server to boot Linux
VCPI is supported by most EMS drivers (if EMS is enabled),
but never under WINDOWS-3.1 or WINDOWS'95.
(However, real DOS-Mode of WINDOWS'95 can have EMS driver with VCPI)
If loading via VCPI you also MUST have:
  1. An interceptable setup-code (see MANUAL.TXT)
  2. Identical Physical-to-Virtual mapping for the first 640 Kbytes

Your current DOS/CPU configuration is:
  load buffer size: 0x00000000     , setup buffer size:  0x3E00
  total memory:     0x00100000
  CPU is in V86 mode
  SetupIntercept: NO
  stat2: cpu_V86, but no VCPI available (check aborted)
  input params (size 0x002B):
    autoboot\vmlinuz initrd=autoboot\initrd.img
  LOADLIN started from DOS-prompt
WARNING: Not enough free memory (load buffer size)
D:\dosutils>
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garbouaCommented:
get a window98 startup disk, start the laptop with that, choose the first option which is starting with cd-rom enabled, then, repeat the autoboot, and it better work this time.
Ps.  did you say you want or don't want to keep your NT OS?
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garbouaCommented:
get a window98 startup disk, start the laptop with that, choose the first option which is starting with cd-rom enabled, then, repeat the autoboot, and it better work this time.
Ps.  did you say you want or don't want to keep your NT OS?
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baigmzAuthor Commented:
I won't mind loosing the NT OS but I would prefer to have booth NT and Linux on the same machine if possible. I have Windows 2000 actually.
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garbouaCommented:
did you try the win98 disk? I tried that on my machine dur weekend and it worked.  how about U
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baigmzAuthor Commented:
Thanks, I'll let you know soon.
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