what does "SUPER " mean?

in the following:

#define SUPER TTActor

what does "SUPER " mean?

tks

she25Asked:
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nietodConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It means "TTActor"

Anythign else?  :-)

what you are looking at is a C Pre-processor statement (any statement that begins with "#" at the start of the line.)  In this case it is a pre-processor #define statement.  This statement is used to create pre-procssor definitions and macros.

In this case it creates a pre-processor defintion.  The definition is for the word "SUPER"  which it defines as "TTActor"  The pre-processor will look through the code and will look for any occurance of "SUPPER" in the code (not in comments or strings) an will replace it with "TTActor".

continues

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newmangCommented:
It doesn't "mean" anything. The line creates an "alias" for TTActor named SUPER.

For example

#define BUFFSIZE 256
char   sz_buffer[BUFFSIZE+1];

strncpy(sz_buffer,source_data,BUFFSIZE);

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nietodCommented:
So for example, if your code was like

#define SUPER TTActor

class TTActor
{
};

SUPER AnActor;

the pre-processor would convert the code to

#define SUPER TTActor

class TTActor
{
};

TTActor AnActor;

Note that this sort of use of the pre-processor is now strongly discouraged.  It was often necessary to use the pre-processor in C, but it also caused lots of problems.  So C+++ provides better alternatives for almost all the features of the pre-processor.   There are still two areas where the pre-processor stil needs to be used, it needs to be used for #include directives and for conditional compilation directives. Like the #ifdef include guards used in many include files.  (These conditional compilations situations often require that #define be used, but the vlaues defined are only used by the pre-processor, they do not direcly affect the code.)
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nietodCommented:
This

>> #define BUFFSIZE 256
>> char   sz_buffer[BUFFSIZE+1];

is one of the things that the pre-processor should not be used for. (In C++, it was necesary in C.).  For example the code

const int BUFFSIZE = 256;
char   sz_buffer[BUFFSIZE+1];

is far better.
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