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W2K Boot Disk with Mouse

Posted on 2001-07-10
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I want to create W2K boot disks to run DOS applications with mouse capability.  I can use MKDISK; then copy the DOS application (e.g., ghostpe.exe) to the boot diskette.  In W98, I would create a simple autoexec.bat with the line MOUSE.COM to add the mouse functionality.  How do I get that functionality in W2K?
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Question by:DocPit
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Expert Comment

by:griessh
ID: 6270362
There is no real MSDOS in Win2000/NT. The Command Prompt works more like a shell that looks like DOS. If you want to run DOS programs without running Windows, why don't you create a WIN98 boot disk?

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Werner
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Expert Comment

by:Gac
ID: 6271143
You cannot create an win2k boot disk in the same way that you could for win9x.  Win2k file structure is larger than one disk, so this can't work.  like Werner says: "The Command Prompt works more like a shell that looks like DOS."  

What are you trying to do with the boot disk?  Maybe I can help you find an alternate solution.

-Gac
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Author Comment

by:DocPit
ID: 6271735
1) My machine is running W2K with NTFS on two physical drives, C: and D:.  There is no FAT partition.
2) I want to run Norton Ghost 2001 to create an image of C: on D:
3) Ghost must be run from a bootdisk for W2K.
4) When I run Ghost from a W98 bootdisk, Ghost see both hard drives (drives 1 and 2) as possible choices to image from. It sees A: and @CD-R1 (my CD-RW/DVD) as the possible drives to write the image to.  It does not see the other physical hard drive (D:), which is where I want to clone to.
5) I have been trying to make the bootdisk manually rather than using the Ghost Boot Wizard because I can't recover (re-download) my Ghost program.  For some reason, I get a download error.

My problem, then, is to make a bootdisk that (1) will run ghostpe.exe and clone C: to D: and (2) allow mouse functionality.
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Accepted Solution

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Gac earned 400 total points
ID: 6271769
Ok, to make a clone of a disk or valume, Win2k has another option for you: create a mirrored set.  

"To Create a RAID 1 (mirrored) Set in Windows 2000
NOTE: All members of a RAID 1 volume set must be on a dynamic disk.
1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Computer Management.
2. Expand the Storage branch, and then click Disk Management.
3. Right-click the partition that you want to mirror, and then click Add Mirror.
4. Click the disk that will host the mirror, and then click Add Mirror.
5. On the Partition menu, click Commit changes now to begin duplication.
6. Reboot the computer after the duplication process is completed.
(c) 2001 Microsoft Corporation, all rights reserved."

What this dies is create a completly identical copy of the information.  If you are just trying to mirror the disk so t hat you can install it on another computer, then you can remove the disk, install it in the other computer, and then make the appropriate changes to the hardware so it boots correctly.

I hope this helps!

-Gac
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Author Comment

by:DocPit
ID: 6274269
Gac,
Thanks for the comment.  My practice in W98 has been to make an updated Ghost image of C: (stored as a .gho file on D:) anytime I make any substantial change to my machine.  It takes a few minutes.  Then, if my system encounters a  problem that is difficult to solve, rather than spending hours or days, I just use Ghost to restore the latest image from D: to C:.  Then I copy back the various settings folders that I back-up daily (Desktop, Favorites, etc).  I'm up and running in a 15-20 minutes.  I would like to use the same strategy in W2K.  Would the mirrored image serve this purpose?  If I had problems with my system, could I restore C: using the mirrored image from D:? If so, how?  Would I simply copy the image from D: back to C: and let it overwrite?
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