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^M

I've got loads of ^M  charcters in my unix files.  

I believe they are windows line breaks which need to be removed.  Can someone suggest a way of getting rid of these ^M file by file apart from the obvious way of manually getting rid of them..

i'm looking for the easiest and most effective way.

many thanks
Peter
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Peewee
Asked:
Peewee
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1 Solution
 
interiotCommented:
tr -d '\r' < filename > fixed_file
mv fixed_file filename


This deletes all occurances of '\r', or ^M.  'tr' usually translates a set of characters to another set of characters, but the -d makes it delete the first set instead.


On a solaris box I'm on, there's a dos2unix command as well, that may work if it's available to you.
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biraCommented:
cat file|sed "s/^M//g">anotherfile
mv anotherfile file
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prashant_n_mhatreCommented:
Open file in VI

:1,$ s'^M''g

To get this '^M' in the command line:
Keep CTRL pressed and then press v and m

You need not to move the existing file.
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yuzhCommented:
Hi Peewee,

    You can use "dos2unix" command to convert the dos file into UNIX
format, in this case is get rid of ^M

    eg.  $dos2unix dos-filename newname
           mv newname dos-filename


     Cheers!

===========

     yuzh
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PeeweeAuthor Commented:
ok, thnaks chaps,

i've tried both the sed and dos2unix operations and both appear to work ok file by file.

The qusetion begs begs if i got 100 files in a directory and thirty directories to do, how should i do this?

can either or both of these be extended to complete directories?

many thanks
Peter
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prashant_n_mhatreCommented:
Peewee if you want to do the same...then you may use the follwoing command in a shell program

strings file > newfile

replace file and newfile by appropriate arguments
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interiotCommented:
First of all, here's a solution which edits files in place, and does it automatically, since no previous solutions fit this criteria:

    perl -pe 's/\r//g' -i filename

And a solution for your second problem:

    find . -print | xargs -n 1 perl -pe 's/\r//g' -i
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yuzhCommented:
Hi Peewee,

    You can use a text editor to put all the file names
including path to the file in a text file FILELIST:

    then do the followings:

    for i in `cat FILELIST`
    do
    dos2unix $i ${i}.unix
    mv $i ${i}.org
    mv ${i}.unix $i
    done

    The above command will do the job for you. It rename the original file to filename.org, and use the original file name for the UNIX format. you can delete all the dos
format file if you don't want to keep them by replace:
     mv $i ${i}.org
     to: rm $i

you can put the about command in a little script.

    Cheers!

=======
yuzh
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PeeweeAuthor Commented:
super!

many thanks
peewee
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