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How to relocate terminal server profiles?

Posted on 2001-07-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
The root drive where the terminal server profiles are stored is almost out of space.  How do I relocate/export the profiles to another drive?
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Question by:JACO
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Expert Comment

by:geoffryn
ID: 6278381
Just move the profile directories to another drive and modify the TS profile entry in User Manager.
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Author Comment

by:JACO
ID: 6278775
Here's some more info:

The profiles are currently stored in T:\wtsvr\profiles\%username%.  I move the profile to V:\Profiles\%username%, share the Profiles folder on the V: drive, and enter \\Servername\Profiles\%username% in TS profile.  As soon as I login as the user, the profile is copied from the V:\ back into %SystemFolder% which is the T:\ drive.  How do I specify the %SystemFolder% to be the V:\ drive instead?
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Author Comment

by:JACO
ID: 6278879
Here's some more info:

The profiles are currently stored in T:\wtsvr\profiles\%username%.  I move the profile to V:\Profiles\%username%, share the Profiles folder on the V: drive, and enter \\Servername\Profiles\%username% in TS profile.  As soon as I login as the user, the profile is copied from the V:\ back into %SystemFolder% which is the T:\ drive.  How do I specify the %SystemFolder% to be the V:\ drive instead?
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Accepted Solution

by:
bhaggard earned 75 total points
ID: 8544896
This should do it!

Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - 214470
How to Move the Location of a Locally Cached Profile
The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Terminal Server Edition
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0
Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0

This article was previously published under Q214470
IMPORTANT: This article contains information about modifying the registry. Before you modify the registry, make sure to back it up and make sure that you understand how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For information about how to back up, restore, and edit the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
256986 Description of the Microsoft Windows Registry

SUMMARY
By default, the locally cached copy of a profile is stored in %SystemRoot%\Profiles\, which may be an issue if you have a large number of people logging on to a computer. If you have a large number of people logging on to a computer (which creates a large number of profiles), disk space on the operating system partition may become scarce. You can move the locally cached copy of a profile to another local partition.
MORE INFORMATION
WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

To move the locally cached copy of the profile, you will need to know the security identifier (SID) of the user whose profile you want to move. You can identify the SID by using GetSID.exe from the Windows NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit.

Windows NT 4.0 stores the local profile information in the registry under the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

Under the ProfileList key, there will be subkeys named with the SIDs of the users who have logged on to this computer. (To find the profile information for the user whose locally cached profile you want to move, find the SID for the user with the GetSID.exe utility.) Inside of the appropriate user's subkey, you will see a string value named ProfileImagePath. ProfileImagePath should be set to a local path where you want to store the profile.

If you do not have a roaming profile and you want to maintain your profile after you change the locally cached profile path, copy the contents of your old locally cached profile folder to the new location set in the ProfileImagePath value.
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