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Can a print queue output raw text to an IP port?

Posted on 2001-07-18
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
I have an application that requires the Novell Netware
v4.1 print queue to output ASCII text print images
to a raw IP address and port, similar to interfacing
to a JetDirect card using TCP/IP (rather than using IPX).
(This is not the LPR protocol - just a plain stream of text sent to an IP address and port.)

Is this possible?
How would it be done?
What is the best way to do this from Netware 4 or 5?

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Question by:hogwell
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by:geoffryn
ID: 6298792
Netware 4.1 does not support TCP/IP printing.  If you have an NT workstation or server you can use it to do LPR printing.
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by:sverre
ID: 6299027
If you use NFS services it can be done in Nw 4.x (also in 3.x), but that product is not free.
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by:Roscoe
ID: 6405238
This is a twisted idea that may work.... at one point (if you loaded Netware v3.1x version), the old RPrinter.exe utility running in a DOS box on an NT workstation (that had LPR printing installed) would actually work -

You defined the NetWare queue destination to a remote printer via PConsole, set queue to print to the remote's LPT2 (or 3?), captured the LPT output via the NT box NetWare client and redirected it to a previously defined local port that was actually your LPR output pointing to an address:port... (I said it was twisted...)

Unknowns include: What older version of the Novell NT client is required, does this work in 4.1 (I remember doing this on a 4.0x server), and can I even find the old RPrinter utility in my slush pile... Comments anyone?
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by:hogwell
ID: 6406824
What I am looking for has nothing to do with LPR, or "TCP/IP Printing" (LPR/LPD protocol).
I would like the ASCII print image bytes to go out
in "raw" mode to a given IP address and port, e.g.
192.168.0.112 port 9000
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Roscoe earned 25 total points
ID: 6407419
Understood: The answer given previously (no) therefore applies, with one caveat:

In conversation with a developer a while back, he maintained that unique applications (this one qualifies) were best handled by custom NLM's. The main issue I foresee is that documentation/expertise for working with print queues combined with knowledge of the entry points into Novell's IP stack for that version of NetWare may now be hard to find. Your best bet is a letter/email submission to the developer's area of Novell's AppNotes at http://developer.novell.com/research/contactus.htm - they may be able to either answer your question or tell you where to go (hmmm, better reword that...<g>), I mean point you in the right direction, if it exists...

Good luck!!
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by:CleanupPing
ID: 9156853
hogwell:
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