Operating System versions? 2.5.1 vs. 5.5.1?

Hi,

Sometimes I hear my unix operating system referred to as 2.5.7 and sometimes I hear it being referred to as 5.5.7.

(uname -a just says 5.7)

What's the difference?
Alex
Alex_TongAsked:
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gstoddartCommented:
When Sun changed from using "SunOS" to "Solaris" the versions got a lot of people confused.

When they left SunOS, it was numbered in the 4.x range.  What they released was a new version of Solaris which was at a lower release number than SunOS.

In order not to confuse things, they made the uname command indicate that it was not at a major version higher than what SunOS was at.

This allowed systems which relied on the output of uname to know they were on something newer (instead of older).

It confused everyone for quite a long time.  Now I think they're up to Solaris 7 or 8, and I believe they jumped a couple of versions to clear up confusion.

Basically it was a bad marketing decision.  =)
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tdaoudCommented:

The specific Kernel of your operating system (the OS program itself) has a version, and the whole os package that the company puts together has a version number.

For example you have RedHat linux version 7.1 that has Kernel version 2.4.2

Hope that helps.

Tarik
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