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(CString) BOOL

Posted on 2001-07-27
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Last Modified: 2009-12-16
Hi

Is there an esy way to convert a BOOL to a string, like "1" = TRUE, "0" = FALSE

CB.
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Question by:win32
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13 Comments
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:smitty1276
ID: 6325987
char boolString[2];
bool boolVal = whatever;

if( boolVal == true )
  strcpy( boolString, "1" );
else
  strcpy( boolString, "2" );


0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ccaprar
ID: 6326000
unless you use .NET ( C# ) or Java, in C++ there is no such API or STD function. Why don't you define a little helper class, that contains the values and their string representations, and have methods as BooleanValue ( from CString, from char*, etc, ) and ToString (from bool). Take a look at Java's String and Boolean classes for some good examples
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Hoegje
ID: 6326099
string boolToString(bool toConv){
  if (toConv == true){
    string tr = "True";
    return tr;
  }
    string fa = "False";
    return fa;
}

I guess this should work...
0
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LVL 22

Accepted Solution

by:
nietod earned 80 total points
ID: 6326341
>> n C++ there is no such API or STD function.
I dissagree--slightly--well, very slightly.

When you ouput a boolean value to a stream using the formatted I/O  (insertion operator (operator <<)) false is oupyutted as 0 and true as 1.   so for example

cout << false;

outputs "0".

You can always use a string stream class to convert formatted I/O to a string like

stringstream S;
bool f = false;
bool t = true;

S << "this is false: " << f << " this is true: " << t;

string AString = S.str();

Noe AString contains a string that says "this is false: 0 this is true: 1".
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:nietod
ID: 6326351
Opps did anyone notice this is for a "CString"  ie. MFC?

You could use CString's Format() member for this.  You could take advantage of the fact that when bool is cast to an int false becomes 0 and tue becomes 1, like

CString S;
bool f = false;

S.Format("this is false: %i", (int) f);


HOWEVER, variable argument procedures like Format() are a little risky to use.  I woudl avoid them wherever possible.  So I woudl actually do something more like what smitty suggested.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:snoegler
ID: 6326723
BOOL b;
CString str = b?"TRUE":"FALSE";

or

bool b;
std::string str = b?"TRUE":"FALSE";
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:makerp
ID: 6326737
>>HOWEVER, variable argument procedures like Format() are
a little risky to use

why neitod
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:nietod
ID: 6326774
VA functions provide no-type safety.   Simple mistakes that would ordinarly be caught by the compiler are not detected and can result in crashes or erratic behavior.
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:makerp
ID: 6326828
is there any safe alternative then ?
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:nietod
ID: 6327231
Yes.  STL doesn't use any VA functions.  In fact, the STL stream classes were developed as a way to avoid VA functions like printf()  (Long before templates were added to the langauge and long before STL was called STL).
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Triskelion
ID: 6327552
What about something as simple as
   return (char)(false + 48); // = '0'
   return (char)(true + 48); // = '0'

#include <afx.h>

char     GetAnswer(bool blnAnswer)
{
     return ((char)(blnAnswer + 48));
}

void main(void)
{
     printf("%c\n"     , GetAnswer(true));
}



0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Triskelion
ID: 6327597
...that should have read...

  return (char)(false + 48); // = '0'
  return (char)(true + 48); // = '1'
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:nietod
ID: 6327663
Why assume that '0" is 48 dec?

Yoiu could do

char     GetAnswer(bool blnAnswer)
{
    return (char)((int)blnAnswer + '0');
}

But seeign as this is askign for a CString, not a char, I don't see how this is that useful.  

bool theBool = false;
CString S = theBool?'1';'0';

would be more useful.
0

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