Solved

Newbie: Red Hat & Win 2000 Together On One Drive?

Posted on 2001-07-29
2
242 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi;

I am window user who would like to give linux a try.

I have a 3 year old Gateway G6-333.  It is running a Pentium II 333mhz
processor, with 191 MB Ram, a 6 gig hard drive and Windows 98 second
edition. I have a cd rom  drive that I can boot off of ( I stuck a red hat disk in, turned the thing
on and landed in the Red Hat Install program ).


I would like to wipe my hard drive clean, and partition it into 3 gigs and
3 gigs. I would like to put Windows 2000 with the NFTS file system on one
half and Red Hat Linux on the second half.

I am told that the tools that come with Red Hat can't deal with the NFTS
file system, so that I will have to partition the hard drive myself.

I am also told that Windows 2000 under nfts needs to be in the boot sector
of the hard drive so that I will need to find a way to make windows boot
linux.

Are both of these statements correct?  Are there other problems with
putting windows 2000 and Red Hat on the same hard drive that I need to be
aware of?

What is the best way for me to proceed?  

I know next to nothing about computer hardware or computer set up tasks.  
I can read and I program for a living.  If someone can point me to
something suitable for an ignorant, but an intelligent beginner that would
be cool.

I guess at the least I need to read something that will tell me how to
partition a hard drive with the resources I have.

Thanks in advance

Steve
0
Comment
Question by:Steve34
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 17

Accepted Solution

by:
dorward earned 200 total points
ID: 6332404
Red Hat can not create NTFS partitions, but it can read them.

Just create them under Windows and leave blank space at the end of the drive to let Red Hat create its partitions.

Take a look at http://www.linuxnewbie.org/
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:psimation
ID: 6333269
You won't have any problems here, except if you would later want to have read/write access to the NTFS partition. Linux only has READ capabilities to NTFS at this stage, so if you want better than just read (and it's not 100% perfected yet either), I would suggest sticking with FAT32 for Windows.
Now, since you have a 6GB disk, you don't have to worry at all about partition sizes.
Just install Windows first and forget about the fact the you are installing Linux in a while. Do everything as if you will only have Windows on the system EXCEPT, leave some space for Linux on the disk (unpartitioned space), ie. during windows installation, just create the windows partition of the size you need for windows and leave the rest of the disk untouched. When you are done with windows, simply boot with the Linux cd and continue as if you only have Linux on the system. Linux install will automatically detect that windows is on the disk and will "work around" it. You only need to create the Linux partitions ( at least one SWAP partition of about the size of your RAM (I use 2X RAM...) , and the at least one Linux Native  Partition with mount point / . When you are finished, LILO (Linux Boot Loader) will be the primary boot loader for the system and you will have either a splash screen or a LILO: prompt (press [TAB] to see options) to select the OS to boot. I am not a big fan of using NTLoader to load Linux. I've never had LILO fail on me...
0

Featured Post

Simplifying Server Workload Migrations

This use case outlines the migration challenges that organizations face and how the Acronis AnyData Engine supports physical-to-physical (P2P), physical-to-virtual (P2V), virtual to physical (V2P), and cross-virtual (V2V) migration scenarios to address these challenges.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

rdate is a Linux command and the network time protocol for immediate date and time setup from another machine. The clocks are synchronized by entering rdate with the -s switch (command without switch just checks the time but does not set anything). …
How many times have you wanted to quickly do the same thing to a list but found yourself typing it again and again? I first figured out a small time saver with the up arrow to recall the last command but that can only get you so far if you have a bi…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.

726 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question