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What about NFTS?

Hi;

I recently posted about having problems with a SLOW windows 98 explorer.

I tried doing a list of things that people recommended and the problem was not solved.

Someone mentioned that the fat32 file system is limited.

Is this true.

I am thinking about upgrading to windows 2000.

Will windows 2000 resolve this issue.  Will I have to use the nfts file system to avoid a slow windows explorer?


Is the nfts file system better?  How so?

I ask because I am thinking about partitioning my hard drive to share it with linux.

I have read some stuff that says that doing this will be a lot harder if I use the nfts files system.

I just want to see if it is worth it.

Thanks

Steve
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Steve34
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Steve34
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jhanceCommented:
>>Someone mentioned that the fat32 file system is limited.

Yes, that's possibly true.  It is limited in several areas when compared to NTFS and other high-performance filesystems.

>>Is the nfts file system better?  How so?

In some ways yes.  In others, no.  If we are talking complexity, then FAT32 wins hands down.  It's quite simple and can be supported on just about any hardware regardless of complexity.  In terms of security, robustness, performance on a multi-user operating system, ability to handle devices in the EXABYTE range, then NTFS wins going away.  

Which is best depends on what you are trying to accomplish.  If you are using W2K then I'd suggest NTFS as preferred.  If, however, you are dual-booting with Win98 or ME, then FAT32 may be your best choice.

When sharing with LINUX, I think you'll be limited to FAT32.  I don't recall that there is currently support for NTFS in Linux.  I may be wrong here and if I am I'm sure someone will point it out.  If there is an NFTS driver for Linux then I again say go with NTFS.

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Steve34Author Commented:
Sounds like it is worth the trouble.

Red Hat 7.0 can read ntfs and I found some instructions on making it live with win 2000.

Thanks
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jhanceCommented:
>>Delete the question. Again, you must tell the other participants why you wish to do this.


Actually, that is no longer the case.  In case you haven't noticed, when a user clicks the DELETE QUESTION button the question is gone without notice to anyone who had commented.
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moduloCommented:
Finalized as proposed

modulo

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