Solved

Setting up a Win2K workstation as I would a Win98 workstation on NT domain

Posted on 2001-07-29
7
218 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Can someone please provide me with directions to setup a win2k workstation so that it ehaves much like a win98 workstation would on NT domain?  I have a dedicated NT server as a PDC on a LAN with 12 win95/98 workstations.  As soon as I added Win2K workstations, I found that I had difficulty getting them to logon to the network.  Each Win95/98 workstation has a unique name and logs onto the network with a password; the username/password combo is setup on the NT PDC.  TIA
0
Comment
Question by:jdindo01
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
7 Comments
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 6333190
JD, whether your installing Windows 2000 or setting up a box with Windows 2000 preinstalled, just use the setup wizard and follow the domain login screens and the box should be fine.

Dennis
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:jhance
ID: 6333875
I think you're in for a rude awakening.  

There is actually no similarity between the way Win2000 workstations participate in an NT DOMAIN and the way Win98 machines do.  It only looks similar to the unsuspecting user.  You, as the system administrator, should know better.

Win98 is a completely unsecured operating system and so the NT DOMAIN "membership" is by definition also unsecured.  Any Win98 computer can be a part of any NT Domain without restrictions.

W2K is secured and when a W2K workstation is a part of an NT DOMAIN, the user authentication function is controlled by the DOMAIN.  In order to join a W2K workstation to the domain you MUST HAVE the "Add Workstation to Domain" privilege on your DOMAIN USER ACCOUNT.  So generally you must logon as Administrator to join to the domain.  After that, any user logon to the W2K workstation will use the DOMAIN ACCOUNT and not the local account.  So you must create user accounts for each user of the W2K machine on the domain.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jdindo01
ID: 6334090
Please clarify:

"In order to join a W2K workstation to the domain you MUST HAVE the "Add Workstation to Domain" privilege on your DOMAIN USER ACCOUNT.  "

In referring to a "DOMAIN USER ACCOUNT" is that an account on the server or on the workstation.  I am guessing the latter which then violates a rule that I have read that you should not logon as Administrator to the workstation all the time.  Any thought?
0
10 Questions to Ask when Buying Backup Software

Choosing the right backup solution for your organization can be a daunting task. To make the selection process easier, ask solution providers these 10 key questions.

 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 6334901
JD, in order to add users, and assign rights, you must be logged on either as an admin, or do so with scripts externally. In this case, logon as an admin, create your user(s) and then log off.
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
toshie earned 100 total points
ID: 6335776
jd,

If you create the users on the workstation you will only have permission to log onto the workstation and access resources locally i.e. on that machine.


If you create user account on the DC you will have an access token to allow you to access resources across the domain. (If you have been granted permissions and shares)

This is different to Win 98, as jhance states there is virtually no security, I wouldn't even think of them in the same light.

In NT/2000 you also need a computer account on the domain. This is not required with Win98.

With Win2000 as with NT You will know if you have permission to log on to the domain as you will have 3 boxes on your log on splashscreen. You may have to click "details" to see all three.

There will be a drop down box by the "domain" option which will allow you to log on locally or onto the domain.

I hope I am not being insulting here but from your initial description I dont know if you have used Win NT Workstations as client machines. If you have ignore the last two paragraphs

toshie
0
 

Author Comment

by:jdindo01
ID: 6353370
Thanks again for the help.  Your comments are not at all insulting.  So, let me make sure I understand:

- setup an account on the PDC with the same username as the Win2K machine name
- setup the win2k workstation so that it is a member of the domain
- setup an account on the workstation?  this is where I am not clear

I would like to have the user log on and have access to domain and local resources at the same time.

JD
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 6353699
JD, the account you setup on the workstation needs to be the same as the share created on the server. The term setting up an account means setting up a user name and password a/k/a profile.
0

Featured Post

Get 15 Days FREE Full-Featured Trial

Benefit from a mission critical IT monitoring with Monitis Premium or get it FREE for your entry level monitoring needs.
-Over 200,000 users
-More than 300,000 websites monitored
-Used in 197 countries
-Recommended by 98% of users

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
There are times when I have encountered the need to decompress a response from a PHP request. This is how it's done, but you must have control of the request and you can set the Accept-Encoding header.
If you’ve ever visited a web page and noticed a cool font that you really liked the look of, but couldn’t figure out which font it was so that you could use it for your own work, then this video is for you! In this Micro Tutorial, you'll learn yo…
Sometimes it takes a new vantage point, apart from our everyday security practices, to truly see our Active Directory (AD) vulnerabilities. We get used to implementing the same techniques and checking the same areas for a breach. This pattern can re…
Suggested Courses

623 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question