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music transfer

Is there anyway I can transfer my music from my Minidisc player or my walkman to my computer so I can burn it in a CD?  Is so how???
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jynx
Asked:
jynx
1 Solution
 
andysalihCommented:
yes use the the line in on your sound card, to your mididisc player,

and use your cd burner to record from line in or record it to your hard drive first then burn it to your cd after.

if you have a cd burner you should has a music or data burning option.

use the music option

also you may need to buy the audio lead which goes from lineout to line in on your sound card.

hope this helps
Andy
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pbessmanCommented:
I use a program called Music Recorder from Data Becker as the software to convert from .wav to whatever.  YOu can take a look at it here:  
http://www.databecker.com/p_musiccdrecord3.htm

"also you may need to buy the audio lead which goes from lineout to line in on your sound card."  The software has a diagram in its booklet showing how to hook it all up.

They cost about 4.00.  They come in a variety of lengths 3,6 and, 9ft.  You can get them where they sell any audio equipment, e.g. Radio Shack, Circuit City, any chain computer store should have them.  What you want is a cable with Stereo Mini plugs on both ends.

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jhanceCommented:
One thing you will probably NOT want to do is to take your MiniDisk music and encode them to MP3s.  The results will be less than desirable.

The problem is that MiniDisk players use ATRAC compression which, like MP3, is a LOSSY compression scheme.  So what you get during playback is NOT what you started with.  It just SOUNDS like the original to the human ear.  Since the MP3 encoder doesn't have the original WAV data to encode, its algorithms don't process the now degraded ATRAC decoded sound and you get a really poor encoding of the music.
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RoadWarriorCommented:
The highest quality way to achieve it I think uses a digital "SPDIF" transfer cable. Minidisk players often have a digital output, and this can be connected with the correct cable to soundcards that have a digital input. However, most cheaper generic soundcards do not have this.

From your walkman, (I presume you mean a tape based one?)  you'll just have to use a generic audio cable as described above. You may get better results from a HiFi tape deck with better speed compensation etc.

regards,

Road Warrior
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bparnesCommented:
I am aware of two commercially available programs that let you burn directly onto a CD from an audio stream into your sound card. One is named Click and Burn, the other is NTI Professional CD Maker. C&B is cheaper than NTI. I've had good results with NTI. I haven't had an opportunity to try out C&B yet though I've seen it praised by others.

An alternative approach is to park the music onto your hard drive in WAV format. If you only have a minute of music you can use the Sound Recorder that ships with Windows. For longer recordings you need a decent sound editor. Two that I recommend are Cool Edit (shareware) and Sound Forge (commercial). There are many other similar programs on the market. (I would suggest you stay away from any Data Becker offering -- they tend not to be cost effective even though they are cheap.) Once you have the music in WAV format on your hard drive, the CD recording software that came with your CD-RW drive should be able to take it from there and you can put it onto a CD without us needing to tell you how.
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theo kouwenhovenCommented:
Yes it is possible connect your Minidisk to the line-in connector of your soundcard. (as andysalih already mentioned).

To record the music and automaticly split it up in the required tracks, you need a package as "Spindoctor". This programs will search (after recording) for "silent gaps" in the WAV file and split it up in tracks.

"Spindoctor" is included in "Easy CD Creator" (deluxe version).
But maybe it is someware available on the net.
(I have it but can't remember from what site it is downloaded, if you like I can search)

GL
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pbessmanCommented:
"One thing you will probably NOT want to do is to take your MiniDisk music and encode them to MP3s.  
The results will be less than desirable."  You would not want to do this through the CD player in your computer, but using the inputs as others have already mentioned it should not be as bad as actually trying to convert the files from one format to the other.

I had forgotten about SONY and this departure.  Just like the Betamax, the minidisk uses technology differently from other devices similar in design.  I read about this when the portable CD players walkman type,(ha ha ha) came out that not only play CDRW but also play MP3.  Sony won't do it because it wants to attempt to preserve the failing minidisk market.


However, you can still get the data stored to your computer using the software I mentioned as it supports several formats.  You can choose WAV files and depite their size should maintain the integrity you want.  No matter how you transfer, whenever any conversion takes place there is loss.

bparnes"(I would suggest you stay away from any Data Becker offering -- they tend not to be cost effective even though they are cheap.)"  What problems have you experienced?  This product is stable,flexible easy to use and has a lot of customized tools to offer. What's negative about that?

I have used it and highly recommend it as it offers very good support for copying of various media, it is easy to set up and despite the fact that you have to pay for it, unlike free"skank"ware, you can contact support as when you pay for software, people generally are there to help you.  One of the biggest things I like is the fact that it helps "clean-up" your recordings.
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