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AIX question

Posted on 2001-08-06
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What is the file that holds the settings that are kind of like path statements in windows?  So that when you type a command you only type the command and not the directory and command everytime.
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Question by:tiger1477
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by:gcauthon
ID: 6356859
For bourne shell, it is ~/.profile, look for the statement "PATH=".
For c shell, it is ~/.cshrc, look for the statement "setenv PATH".
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griessh earned 50 total points
ID: 6356877
a few more ways ... do you want to know where to set them or do you want to find out where your current path is set?

In your home directory you will find several files that start with a '.' (this makes them invisible, use ls -ls to see them). The file that is used by your login shell is a starting point to look for the PATH variable. But that might already been set in a central login file ... so check these login scripts also for other scripts that get called.

.cshrc, .login, .profile are files to check. If you want to know where it is set (as long as it is in YOUR script), do a
grep PATH .*

======
Werner
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by:mrn060900
ID: 6358714
Take a look at /etc/profile, this file is the default profile for all users, the .profile in the users home directory is used for individual changes/preferences.

Regards Mike
www.unixonline.co.uk
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by:tiger1477
ID: 6367935
Thanks for the help that gave me what I needed.
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