Solved

Servlets and JAXP

Posted on 2001-08-06
7
443 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-24
I need to do some XSLT processing in a servlet using the new TRaX functionality of JAXP 1.1.  Whenever I try to do a transform however, I get the following error:

java.lang.NoSuchMethodError
     at org.apache.xpath.DOM2Helper.getNamespaceOfNode(DOM2Helper.java:348)
     at org.apache.xml.utils.TreeWalker.startNode(TreeWalker.java:281)
     at org.apache.xml.utils.TreeWalker.traverse(TreeWalker.java:119)
     at org.apache.xalan.transformer.TransformerIdentityImpl.transform(TransformerIdentityImpl.java:320)

In order to be sure it had nothing to do with the JARs in my WEB-INF\lib directory I wrote a simple class that I could call either from the JDK or from the doGet method of a servlet:


import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilder;
import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory;  
import javax.xml.parsers.FactoryConfigurationError;  
import javax.xml.parsers.ParserConfigurationException;
 
import org.xml.sax.SAXException;  
import org.xml.sax.SAXParseException;  
import org.w3c.dom.Document;
import org.w3c.dom.DOMException;
import java.io.*;
import com.lhs.pim.util.XSLTUtil;

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
     Test.TestXSLT();
    }
   
    public static void TestXSLT() {
     System.out.println("javax.xml.parsers.SAXParserFactory: " + System.getProperty("javax.xml.parsers.SAXParserFactory"));
     System.out.println("javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory : " + System.getProperty("javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory"));
     Document document = null;
     
     DocumentBuilderFactory factory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
     try {
         File f = new File("C:\\ods\\bin\\test.xml");
         DocumentBuilder builder = factory.newDocumentBuilder();
         document = builder.parse(f);
     } catch (SAXException sxe) {
         // Error generated by this application
         // (or a parser-initialization error)
         Exception  x = sxe;
         if (sxe.getException() != null)
          x = sxe.getException();
         x.printStackTrace();
     } catch (ParserConfigurationException pce) {
         // Parser with specified options can't be built
         pce.printStackTrace();
     } catch (IOException ioe) {
         // I/O error
         ioe.printStackTrace();
     }

     System.out.println(XSLTUtil.toString(document));
    }
   
}

This works fine when run under JDK1.3 with the classpath containing all of the jars in my WEB-INF\lib directory, but it gives me the error show above when run during the doGet handler of a servlet.

Any ideas?
0
Comment
Question by:derekl
  • 3
  • 3
7 Comments
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:black
ID: 6357780
which appserver are you using? it's quite possible that the appserver parses an xml file before you do and therefore it loads up and xml parser, when you do your call your load up the one that's already instantiated and now your parser.
Try replacing the xml parser that your appserver comes with, with the xml parser that your application wants to use.
try printing out in your servlet:
    System.out.println("javax.xml.parsers.SAXParserFactory: " + System.getProperty("javax.xml.parsers.SAXParserFactory"));
    System.out.println("javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory : " + System.getProperty("javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory"));
0
 

Author Comment

by:derekl
ID: 6357839
I'm using Tomcat version 3.2.  When I run the servlet under Tomcat both of the System Properties I printed out came up as null.  It's interesting that parsing the test.xml file worked correctly but the xslt portion failed.
0
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
black earned 250 total points
ID: 6357846
have you tried replacing the tomcat's xml parsers with yours? you can actually simply change the tomcat.bat file so your parsers appear before the tomcat parsers in the CLASSPATH and that way your parsers will be loaded first. I think it's better to remove the existing ones and use your ones that way there is not editing needed.
0
Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 

Expert Comment

by:wkang14
ID: 6359907
We have similar problem before when we are using xalan.  After we put xalan.jar & xerces.jar in the begin of classpath.  It solved the problem.
0
 

Author Comment

by:derekl
ID: 6360022
Yeah, I just moved xalan.jar, jaxp.jar, and crimson.jar to the %TOMCAT_HOME%\lib directory from my web apps WEB-INF\lib directory and it worked fine.  I am curious why it would not work with those three files in the WEB-INF\lib directory, because files in that directory are supposed to be added to the CLASSPATH.
0
 

Author Comment

by:derekl
ID: 6361394
Thanks, you got me on the right track.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:black
ID: 6362007
They are added to the classpath but after the entries in the %TOMCAT_HOME%\lib directory which means that when a search happens through the classpath for a suitable parser the tomcat parser's are found first and your parsers are not uses. that's why changing the order of the entries in the classpath fixes your problem.
Future versions of servlet engines and application servers are required to host the webapps on a separate classpath so that this issue does not occur. I'm not sure which servers do this yet.
0

Featured Post

MIM Survival Guide for Service Desk Managers

Major incidents can send mastered service desk processes into disorder. Systems and tools produce the data needed to resolve these incidents, but your challenge is getting that information to the right people fast. Check out the Survival Guide and begin bringing order to chaos.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This was posted to the Netbeans forum a Feb, 2010 and I also sent it to Verisign. Who didn't help much in my struggles to get my application signed. ------------------------- Start The idea here is to target your cell phones with the correct…
Introduction Java can be integrated with native programs using an interface called JNI(Java Native Interface). Native programs are programs which can directly run on the processor. JNI is simply a naming and calling convention so that the JVM (Java…
Viewers learn how to read error messages and identify possible mistakes that could cause hours of frustration. Coding is as much about debugging your code as it is about writing it. Define Error Message: Line Numbers: Type of Error: Break Down…
Viewers will learn about the different types of variables in Java and how to declare them. Decide the type of variable desired: Put the keyword corresponding to the type of variable in front of the variable name: Use the equal sign to assign a v…

733 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question