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"not all control paths return a value"

Posted on 2001-08-09
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Last Modified: 2006-11-17
Hi guys,

I'm fond of writing loops with a return statement in the body, usually when there need not be any other return statement...for example,

int someFunction()
{
for(int i=0; i<arraySize; i++)
    if(array[i] == TRUE)
         return i;
}

You usually get a compiler warning for this sort of thing. I typically argue that I'm well aware that not all paths return a value because, say, I know that there will be at least one array[i] that will be true (or something like that)

My question is, is this a bad coding practise? It is unabasahed laziness on my part, that's for sure, but how harmful is it?

Thanks

Senkwe
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Question by:chandas
3 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:vfinn
ID: 6367612
It's not really bad but it's probably best to give a default return at the bottom
This gets rid of the warning and is safer in case of unexpected behaviour (e.g. arraySize being a strange value, etc..)

The alternative is to have a variable iReturnValue which you set in the for loop and then always return that, but that means you have to use a break in the for loop or you lose speed which is probably worse
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Accepted Solution

by:
AlexVirochovsky earned 150 total points
ID: 6367662
>>is this a bad coding practise?
No, I don't think so. I saw many codes and wrote many
times such code, BUT remember: you must free all
memory before return. Next code will be memory leek:

char *sz = new char[255];
...
for(int i=0; i<arraySize; i++)
   if(array[i] == TRUE)
        return i;
 delete [] sz;

return -1;
..
If you want get rid of worning, set in last line
return -1; as im my example.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:jasonclarke
ID: 6367668
You should strive to produce warning free code, the way to handle this situation is to use an assertion (of some sort):

int someFunction()
{
   for(int i=0; i<arraySize; i++)
      if(array[i] == TRUE)
          return i;

   assert(0); // Should Never Reach this point
   return 0;  // Dummy Return
}

this makes your assumption explicit, you are not leaving it to other programmers to decipher your assumption.

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