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file case sensitivity in NT/Windows 2000

Posted on 2001-08-13
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NT is apparently case sensitive.  However, I believe that it may just preserve case.  I am wishing to copy files of the following format to the same directory on NT:

MYNAME.TXT
myname.txt
Myname.txt

I have read a microsoft article suggesting that NT 3.1 will do this.  The reason I wish to do this is to copy data that has been generated on Linux systems onto an NT partition.  Linux's ext2 file system supports this naming natively.

I think that NT is capable of this.  I think that in order to provide backwards compatibility it disallows two files of the same name to be created in the same directory.

Is there any registry hack or other than can enable files with the same name but different case to be created in the same directory in NT4 or Win2000.

Many thanks

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Question by:craigggg
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chris_calabrese earned 800 total points
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The underlying NT filesystem is case sensitive.  However the Win32 API is not case sensitive.  I believe the only way you can get case insensitivity is to use the POSIX sub-system.  Now that I think about it, SMB mounting from a Linux system might work too, but I wouldn't swear to that.

BTW, the dichotomy of the Win32 API not being case-sensitive and the underlying filesytem being case sensitive allows for some interesting security attacks on filesystem objects, including system level files...
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No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area to:
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