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Where can I find GOOD on-line doc that explains lost+found?

Posted on 2001-08-16
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Please refer to the title. If you can't point me to documentation, can you tell me what you know about lost+found on Solaris? Specifically, I have a mounted nfs filesystem that I expected to find a lost+found directory ... but didn't. Why isn't there? If there's some good doc on this subject (on-line), I'd sure like to know about it.

Thanks!
Marty
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Question by:pzxkys
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Expert Comment

by:bira
ID: 6394059
Hi
  You can create a directory lost+found with the
command mklost+found, just firing this command where
you want to create the dir.

Description

The mklost+found command creates a lost and found directory in the
current directory. A number of empty files are created within the
lost and found directory and then removed so that there are empty
slots for the fsck command. The fsck command reconnects any orphaned
files and directories by placing them in the lost and found directory
with an assigned i-node number. The mklost+found command is not normally
needed, since the fsck command automatically creates the lost and
found directory when a new file system is created.

Examples

To make a lost+found directory for the fsck command, enter:

mklost+found

   Regards
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Author Comment

by:pzxkys
ID: 6394310
I don't see mklost+found in the Solaris man pages. Are you sure it's a valid command for Solaris? Any reason why the lost+found directory might have disappeared after I mounted the nfs filesystem that I'm dealing with?
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Expert Comment

by:bira
ID: 6394373
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Expert Comment

by:bira
ID: 6394376

 In fact my OS is AIX.
  I think there must be something similar in Solaris,
  but i really dont know.

  Perhaps you should put this question in the Solaris topic.

         Good Luck
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Expert Comment

by:prashant_n_mhatre
ID: 6395073
lost+found is a directory used by the /etc/fsck program; fsck is the Unix/Linux equivalent of Windows scandisk.  Both fsck and scandisk attempt to fix disk corruption problems.  Sometimes, they find data that cannot
accurately be associated with other files.  Rather than remove this potentially valuable data, they save it.  Scandisk produces files like FILE0001.CHK, and fsck produces files like 293823 in the lost+found directory
that should exist on each of the hard drives you have in your system.

If your system is running properly, lost+found may seem like an unnecessary directory, but if you crash, lose power or otherwise encounter an event that corrupts your disk, fsck may need lost+found in order to save data.
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Author Comment

by:pzxkys
ID: 6396760
Thank you Prashant. Any idea why a lost+found directory would be missing from a newly mounted nfs filesystem?
Bira: sorry ... I missed the fact that there actually was a Solaris topic in expert's exchange. Thanks for pointing it out. In the future, I'll use it.
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Accepted Solution

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jlevie earned 100 total points
ID: 6396965
Assuming that by 'newly mounted nfs filesystem' you mean a volume mounted via nfs on a client, then it is normal and correct to not see a lost+found directory when the export isn't at the top of a file system. Consider the case where the exports on the Solaris server looks like:

share -F nfs -d "whole fs" /nfs0
share -F nfs -d "only subdir" /nfs1/some-dir

When those are nfs mounted on a client like:

mount server:/nfs0 /mnt-whole
mount server:/nfs1/some-dir /mnt-subdir

There will be a lost+found dir visible on /mnt-whole, but you won't see a lost+found on /mnt-subdir. Of couse the reason that you don't see a lost+found dir on /mnt-subdir is that the export was not done at the top of the file system. And that's fine because a lost+found fir only makes sense on a file system that can be fsck's, which isn't possible for an nfs mounted volume. You can only run fsck on a UFS file system where access to the home blocks is available.

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Author Comment

by:pzxkys
ID: 6398581
Prashant offered a good answer but I have to give the points to jlevie for an even better answer. Thanks to all of you!
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