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Lock directory in win2k and NTFS

Posted on 2001-08-18
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Last Modified: 2006-11-17
1. I would like to lock a certain directory in win2k. That's only people with password to the directory can get access to it. I expect there will be a pop-up password box when users try to access the directory through MY COMPUTER. Can I do that in win2k without using other software?

ps: I don't want to assign user rights to different users

2. By the way, I am using FAT32, but not NTFS. I believe only NTFS has higher security. If I change to NTFS, will there be more function, such as directory lock in win2k? Will the win9x comparible softwares cannot be run?

Thank you
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Question by:CYBERWORLD
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by:pssiew
ID: 6401495
cyberworld,

if you don't want to change to NTFS, one way would be to share the file with a password. So only ppl with the password can access it.

If you use NTFS, you can assign ppl to a group and assign that group to have access to that directory and others will not have access.
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by:CYBERWORLD
ID: 6402501
"I expect there will be a pop-up password box when users try to access the directory
through MY COMPUTER."

Can I do that with external software?
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by:pssiew
ID: 6402518
on first access, you will get a promt for username and password. Unless the user has already saved it under his/her password list.

I am not sure of any software out there which can do this but I am sure there are third party software which can do it.
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arminl earned 300 total points
ID: 6411585
Since your users are supposed to use "my computer" I guess that they are logged on locally. So using share level permissions to protect access is of no use.

If you are talking about using local files, there is no way to protect them as long as you use FAT. You need NTFS.

One of the many benefits you get from NTFS is support for Access Control Lists. A user trying to access a protected area doesn't have to give a password, NTFS is able to handle access based on the login name of the user. The admin or the creator of a file or directory my configure an access control list saying that only specific users or groups of users may access that file.

If you convert to NTFS (which you can do without loosing any data by issuing the convert c: /fs:ntfs command and reboot) you won't be able to access the files using W9x or ME any more, if you intend to dual-boot (have both NT and W9x on the box and choose at boot time which one to use).

If you run just NT convert the harddrive, it's very unlikely that you run into problems with your software when you use NTFS instead of FAT32.

Armin Linder

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