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Problems with DECIMALS WHILE IMPORTING ORACLE TABLES

Posted on 2001-08-20
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
This is the problem:

I need to import Oracle 8.0.5 tables in an Access 2000 database. Some fields in the tables are defined NUMBER 16,8. When I try to import the tables, a message box appears telling me that there is a decimal problems. (If I try to attach the tables, the problem appears too.)

Note: the problem doesn't appear  with Access 1997 and the importation works perfectly.

Could you be of any help?
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Question by:her7
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12 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:PsychoDazey
ID: 6407137
What number is the error message?
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:PsychoDazey
ID: 6407163
0
 

Author Comment

by:her7
ID: 6407604
There is no message number in the dialog box except this information :

"The precision of the decimal field is too small to accept the value you try to add".
Also, there are an OK button and a HELP button, but help is not available.

I try to install Oracle version 8.1.7, but the problem always appears.
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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:LogicalMan
ID: 6407664
her7,

  I have found a similar problem when importing currency details from a csv file. My way round this was to link to the import file (table, spreadsheet etc), read the items in as a variant then convert them before writing them to a local table.

HTH

Tony
0
 

Author Comment

by:her7
ID: 6407673
LogicalMan ...

Could you be more explicit ... please!
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Author Comment

by:her7
ID: 6407683
Also,  when I try to link to the import file, all the fields contain "#ERROR".
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Koka
ID: 6407905
I guess it's you ODBC driver problem - try changing it. To my experience, with Oracle 7 I had problems with Oracle diver, while with Oracle 8 with the microsoft one.

If that's one-time task You could also try to import data as string and convert it to numbers in Access (say, create View in oracle with that Number(16,8) field converted to varchar2 and import that view).
Good luck
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:hnasr
ID: 6408057
Could be a relevant question:
Question: Oracle numeric primary key showing as text in A/97
http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qShow.jsp?ta=msaccess&qid=20153726

This was my comment:
From: hnasr

I am away from my Oracle to try. But I guess the NUMBER(16) format has no Integer equivalent in Access,
and hence it is translated to TEXT field.
---
The problem could be in the accuracy of the linked oracle table fields.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:hotbudare
ID: 6408273
Have u tried using the Decimal data type?

HTH/EQTA
T.S.U. Mario Osorio
Punto Fijo, falcon, Venezuela
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Nosterdamus
ID: 6408881
Hi her7,

Here are links to Oracle ODBC drivers. I suggest that you try to install the latest (for your version) and try again:

1. Oracle ODBC Drivers
http://otn.oracle.com/software/utilities/software_index.htm

2. Oracle Rdb ODBC Drivers
To download these drivers you have to be a member. Membership is free, so you should not have any problem downloading it once you sign up.

Hope this helps,

Nosterdamus
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
LogicalMan earned 300 total points
ID: 6410782
Her 7,

  The drivers you want should be in the MDAC 2.5 driver file available from Micrisoft.com - Downloads (Free download).

  Concerning my previous answer regarding importing. I link the external table, leaving all data types of the linked table to default.
I then open a recordset, in code, to this table, and raed in each field as a variant variable type, and then convert this into the correct variable type (e.g. Date/Time, Integer, String, Double, Long, etc, etc), before writing it out to the local table.
 This has two benefits::
1. You keep control over the data being entered into your local table, and
2. You can convert any dubious data types as you wish.

HTH

Tony
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:hotbudare
ID: 6469170
??
0

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