Solved

How to disable DNS via prompt

Posted on 2001-08-30
5
235 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-16
How do I disable DNS via a terminal prompt?
0
Comment
Question by:0biwan
5 Comments
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 6440444
What do you mean by "disable DNS?"

Do you want to no longer resolve names through DNS?  In that case, you simply remove the nameserver entries from /etc/resolv.conf (or remove references to DNS from /etc/nsswitch.conf if your system has it).

Or do you want to no longer have your machine act as a DNS server?  In that case you disable the startup script for it (probably under /etc/rc.?/*bind)
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:auther_bin
ID: 6440586
shutdown DNS from prompt:
        killall named
disable DNS startup when bootup
        mv /etc/rc.d/rc?.d/S??named /etc/rc.d/rc?.d/K??named

0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:ksemat
ID: 6461226
Depending on your distribution, you can kill the named process by using
killall named as already mentioned, in Redhat you can run linuxconf go to control service activity look for named (or bind?) and select it and uncheck the box that has automatic.
For SuSE depending on distribution edit /etc/rc.config and set
START_NAMED="no"
Any other distro, you need to cd /etc/rc.d/init.d
rm named
you can then depending on which runlevel you boot into e.g if it is runlevel 3 cd /etc/rc.d/rc3.d
rm S??named where ?? represents a number that ls in the directory will show.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:auther_bin
ID: 6491509
Many ways:
1. [root@yousrhost]# killall named
2. [root@yousrhost]# /etc/rc.d/init.d/named stop
3. [root@yousrhost]# kill `pidof named`
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
SpideyMod earned 0 total points
ID: 8276337
All,
I am unlocking this question in preparation for cleanup.  I will return in 7 days to finalize this question.  Please leave any recommendations for the final state of this question, I will take all recommendations into consideration.  Failing any feedback, I may decide in 7 days to delete or PAQ this question with no refund.  Thanks.

SpideyMod
Community Support Moderator @Experts Exchange
0

Featured Post

Three Reasons Why Backup is Strategic

Backup is strategic to your business because your data is strategic to your business. Without backup, your business will fail. This white paper explains why it is vital for you to design and immediately execute a backup strategy to protect 100 percent of your data.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
It’s 2016. Password authentication should be dead — or at least close to dying. But, unfortunately, it has not traversed Quagga stage yet. Using password authentication is like laundering hotel guest linens with a washboard — it’s Passé.
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

785 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question