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Figuring out system info in AIX

Posted on 2001-09-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
I'm writing a script for software installation & I need to be able to determine if my AIX systems are 32 or 64 bit via some command line something or other...

I looked at lsattr -El sys0 & lscfg -vp...nothing jumps out & screams 'I'm 64 bit' to me.

Is there any method where I can determine this for a ksh script?

TIA!



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Question by:damon_s
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by:mrn060900
ID: 6460262
Do you wish to identify which programs are 64 or 32 bit, or if your OS is 64 or 32 bit?

Mike
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by:damon_s
ID: 6478423
figured it out... be root & do #bootinfo -y
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by:tfewster
ID: 7774857
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave a recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area as follows:
- PAQ & refund points

Please leave any comments here within the next 7 days

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER !

tfewster (I don't work here, I'm just an Expert :-)
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SpideyMod earned 0 total points
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per recommendation

SpideyMod
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by:seanc724
ID: 8294331
actually, 'bootinfo -y' tells you if your *processor* is 32-bit or 64-bit...

'bootinfo -K' tells you what in what version the *kernel* is running.
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